Diets in Review - Find the Right Diet for You

Alli



Alli No Longer Experiencing Shortage of Orlistat

Alli was the first FDA approved diet pill to hit the market and experienced a shortage recently. “We had experienced a supply shortage of the active ingredient used to make the product,” a representative from GlaxoSmithKline Consumer Healthcare said in an email. “The supply issue has been resolved.”

The active ingredient they are referring to is orlistat. It helps with weight loss by suppressing the body’s ability to absorb fat in the intestines and can block up to 25 per cent. When the body is unable to absorb the fats they become undigested waste.

Studies on the amount of weight loss you can lose with Alli are limited but you can expect to lose three to five pounds more a year than if you were relying on diet and exercise alone.
Read Full Post >



A Magic Pill: What You Need to Know About Diet Pills

Don’t you wish you could be like Alice in Wonderland and drink a magic potion and you’d be smaller? Many diet aids claim to do just that. But before you go running to the diet aisle here are a few things you should know:

BUYER BEWARE!

1. They are not evaluated or approved by the FDA. This means these products do not go under the same safety and efficacy scrutiny as a prescription you get filled from your friendly neighborhood pharmacist. If you are someone who has diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol or any other health conditions or are taking any prescription medications you definitely want to check with a doctor first before you start to take anything.


Read Full Post >



Weight Loss News in Review – Week of May 23

Each week, DietsInReview.com will recap the hottest headlines in weight loss, diet and health news to keep you informed of news you can really use.

Warning Alli Linked to Liver Damage

There’s been a warning to all consumers of Alli and Xenical: The FDA has linked the weight loss pills to severe liver damage in certain rare cases.

50 Cent Sheds 54 Pounds

Rapper 50 Cent went from 214 pounds and he now clocks in at 160 pounds, and publishes pictures online.


Read Full Post >



Warning Alli Linked to Liver Damage

Warning to all consumers of Alli and Xenical: The FDA has linked the weight loss pills to severe liver damage in certain rare cases.

“The Food and Drug Administration said Wednesday it has added a warning about the risk to the label of the drug, which is sold over-the-counter by GlaxoSmithKline. A prescription version called Xenical is manufactured by Roche and sold by Glaxo.”

Currently the FDA has identified 13 confirmed cases of liver damage linked to Alli and Xenical. Xenical has been on the market since 1997 and available via doctor’s prescription. Alli, a newer consumer version of the weight loss drug, has been available over-the-counter since 2007.

Alli, which had sales nearing 300 million dollars in 2009, has been performing below Wall Street estimates. Poor sales of the lifestyle drug can be attributed to poor economic conditions as well as unpleasant side effects, such as anal leakage.

Doctors urge patients taking these weight loss pills to monitor signs of liver injury, including itching, yellow eyes and skin and loss of appetite.

Also read:



Dangerous Fake Alli Sold Online

GlaxoSmithKline, makers of the popular weight loss supplement Alli, are funding a documentary on the eating habits of Americans. They could also fund another documentary; this one on the industry of pirated drugs sold on the Internet… including their own Alli.alli

The counterfeit Alli looks a lot like the real Alli. But, the counterfeit pills are filled with sibutramine, not Orlistat – the main ingredient in authentic Alli.

The main difference between sibutramine and Orlistat is that the former is a substance that should not be used without a doctor’s oversight. Sibutramine is the active ingredient in the prescription weight loss drug Meridia. What’s worse, Alli is taken three times daily, while Meridia should only to be taken once a day.

So far, there is no word on the fake Alli making its way to brick and mortar retail outlets. According to GlaxoSmithKline, you can identify the fake, and potentially fatal, Alli by scoping out the following clues:
Read Full Post >