Diets in Review - Find the Right Diet for You

walking



Don’t Succumb To “Sitting Disease.” Stand Up and Live Longer At Work

Stand up! Whether you work in a cubicle farm, an office with windows or other desk “situation,” stand up! Because all that sitting is not only bad for your waistline, it contributes to  muscle degeneration, poor circulation, foggy brain, disk degeneration, and a whole host of other bad consequences for your body. If you have a sit-down job, you need to rethink your workstation – now!

standing desk 1

Create a Standing Work Desk

You may be chained to a desk job but that doesn’t mean your butt has to be chained to the seat. Studies show you burn 40 percent more calories standing than sitting, and it may even be better for your metabolic system. The beauty of the standing work desk is that you can get creative and DIY yourself a solution, or purchase a commercial desk.

standing desk 2This stand-up station from Office Max costs $219.00 and allows the user to adjust the keyboard and monitor to the perfect height for standing, then back down for sitting.  Experts say that a 50:50 sitting/standing ratio per day is optimal.

Low on funds? Don’t let that be an excuse to keep on sitting. My standing desk is comprised of a laptop stacked on an empty Amazon delivery box that sits on the kitchen counter. It’s not pretty, but it works. Bonus – When the dishwasher goes through the final dry cycle, I get a nice little steam facial because it’s nestled under the counter below me.

As you set up your standing desk, be sure to remember these important tips:

  • Adjust the monitor height so it doesn’t cause neck fatigue
  • Wear comfortable shoes
  • Place a mat underneath you to reduce fatigue and joint pain


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Walk More, Live Longer

By Team Best Life

The more walking you do and the faster you do it the healthier you’ll be, suggests a new study. People who got more than the recommended 150 minutes of moderate intensity aerobic activity per week in the form of walking were 33 percent less likely to die during the 9-year study; those who met the activity recommendations were 11 percent less likely to die. And speed matters: Slower walkers were more at risk than those who kept a quicker pace. Those who walked slower than a 24-minute mile were 44 percent more likely to die of any cause.

walking

Every burst of activity you do during the day counts toward that goal. Every time you walk to speak to a coworker instead of calling or emailing, every time you take the stairs instead of the elevator, every time you park your car a little farther from your destination and walk the rest of the way—those minutes count toward your daily tally.


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Work it Off: Burn Away a 446-Calorie Bowl of Soup

During winter I make a lot of soup. But it’s hard to find a recipe that has enough protein, fiber, fat and so forth to keep me satisfied for hours after mealtime. Recently I tried a new take on tomato soup—one with lots of chickpeas in it. It’s actually pretty similar to the Best Life Diet’s Chickpea and Tomato Soup, only I add a scoop of pesto and leave out the ginger, cilantro, curry, and lemon.

tomato pesto soup

This is no overindulgence—all of the ingredients are healthy and eaten together they really do provide a filling, tasty meal. But I was pretty surprised to see that the aforementioned recipe packs a 446-calorie punch. This isn’t a crazy amount of calories—as I mentioned, it feels filling enough that I tend to skip my afternoon snack when I eat it for lunch—but it still seems high for vegetable soup. Add on the fact that I sit at a desk for most of the day and you’ll see how a even a healthy soup could potentially lead to unwanted pounds.

So, how can I make sure that this delicious soup fuels more than just my fingers, typing away on the keyboard? Here are 3 ways to burn off the 446 calories in from this bowl of soup:


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Work it Off: Burn Away the 250 Calories from 2 Glasses of Red Wine

This year my family skipped the holiday get-together, opting instead to gather for a mid-January weekend in Sonoma, California. Sonoma, which is about an hour and a half north of San Francisco, is in the heart of California wine country. My parents, sister, and I all agreed this was the perfect destination for a getaway because we’re all oenophiles. (Oenophile? I know. It’s a pretentious word that’s impossible to pronounce, but it sounds so much more dignified than, “we all really enjoy a good glass of Pinot”.)

  REd wine

It probably goes without say that there was a lot of wine on the menu this weekend. There were wine tastings at a few vineyards and then large dinners which were, of course, accompanied by more vino. The food was spectacular—that’s another given in NorCal—but it’s the wine I’m most worried about throwing off my resolutions.


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Freelance White House Photographer Carrie Devorah Dropped 8 Sizes After Knee Injury and Hip Replacement

Carrie Devorah was a vibrant woman with an enviable freelance career through the White House News Photographers Association. She was fit and led an active lifestyle. That was before an unfortunate accident took away her mobility, self-confidence and was ultimately the catalyst for a 50+ pound weight gain. After several surgeries, learning “how” to eat and what exercises she could do safely with a limited range of movement, Carrie has now gone from a size 18 to a size 10.

Carrie Devorah BeforeAfter

Her life-changing accident

Although Carrie admits she never had the perfect diet, she was always able to counter poor eating choices with hard work in the gym. Unfortunately, Carrie’s downward spiral occurred during a fluke accident when slipped in a rental apartment and hyperextended her knee. The knee never healed correctly and eventually, she had to undergo surgery to repair a torn meniscus followed by a hip replacement, all in the same leg. During this time her mobility was greatly decreased and a deep depression settled over her.  ”I was a vibrant person dying inside an increasingly obese person,” she admitted. “I was struggling in pain while losing a career and my social identity.”

Dark days

Due to the extent of her injuries, Carrie’s recovery lasted years and it was a painful process. First she became a recluse and then made “getting to the coffee shop” her daily mission. While that was good for exercise, it was a hindrance to her diet. “Coffee meant a pastry which meant I could delay struggling to walk back to my apartment,” she said. Early on she met a physical therapist who “got her.” She credits the PT with giving her the information she needed about counting calories but admitted it was tough to stick to noting, the worse the pain got, the  less she moved and the more she ate.
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