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Type 2 diabetes



No Plan Presented in Massachusetts Health Director’s Desire to Lower State’s Obesity Rates

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released new frightening statistics for the obesity rates across the country. Obesity rates in America are climbing rapidly, with an estimated 35.7% of the adult population classified as such. The South has the highest obesity rate and the Midwest is right behind them. Citizens living in Northeast and West have the lowest obesity rates.

As reported by BizJournal.com, Massachusetts is the third lowest obesity rate state. However, Massachusetts should not celebrate their bronze medal in these results. Massachusetts may have a low obesity rate compared to 47 states, but that does not mean there isn’t a problem internally with the state. One-third of Massachusetts children and two-thirds of the adult population are either obese or overweight.

Cheryl Bartlett, director of the Massachusetts Bureau of Community Health and Prevention, speaks out on the state’s health issue. “On a national level, (Massachusetts) looks pretty good. But we’ve got a long way to go.” Bartlett and her organization have a goal for the state of Massachusetts. They want to see obesity levels decrease by 5% within the next 15 years. Plus, a reduction in type 2 diabetes and high cholesterol cases. However, no specific plan to reach that was shared.
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MyNetDiary Diabetes Tracker: An Essential Mobile App for Diabetics

MyNetDiary - one of the top diet apps available to smart phone users – launched a new online and mobile app called Diabetes Tracker that’s specifically designed to help those with diabetes better manage their condition.

Launched in 2007 and now hosting more than 2.5 million members, MyNetDiary wanted to bring a diabetes-friendly app to the market since it’s a disease affecting nearly 26 million people in the U.S. alone.

Sergey Oresko, CEO of MyNetDiary, said in a press release that since launching their initial diet app, the company has received a number of requests for an app that caters specifically to diabetics.

“We’ve been asked by thousands of our members to help them track their battle with diabetes,” he said. “And after a year of work on this, we’re pleased to offer the most user-friendly and easy app for tracking everything related to diabetes, diet and exercise, all wrapped into a single iPhone app.”

We recently chatted with Ryan Newhouse, MyNetDiary marketing director, to get a better understanding of how the app works. First, he explained that the Diabetes Tracker is an educational tool and is not intended to diagnose, treat or cure any ailment or disease. 
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School Food Laws May be Reducing Children’s Weight, Study Finds

When it comes to childhood obesity in the U.S., we obviously have a problem. An estimated one in three American kids and teens is obese, according to the American Heart Association. And as a result, weight-related diseases like Type 2 diabetes are on the rise in children, which leaves health experts scrambling for ways to reverse this alarming trend.

But thanks to various food laws put in place in some schools, we may be making some healthy progress.

According to a new study published in the journal Pediatrics, strict laws that curb the sales of junk food and sugary drinks in schools may be reducing children’s BMIs and slowing overall weight gain.

To conduct the study, researchers analyzed 6,300 students in 40 states, first measuring their heights and weights when they were fifth graders in 2004, and again when they were eighth graders in 2007. Over the same lapse of time, researchers also examined the databases of several state laws concerning nutrition in these schools.

Among the schools examined, there were a range of laws in place to govern the food and drinks being sold either in vending machines or school stores outside of designated meal times. These laws included restrictions on the sugar and fat contents of food and beverages, and the severity of these laws ranged from district to district.
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Strength Training May Help Prevent Diabetes, Study Shows

A study that’s been nearly two decades in the making is shining some new light on the benefits of weight training. Researchers from the Harvard University of Public Health have found that this popular form of exercise not only provides bigger biceps, but may also help prevent Type 2 diabetes.

It’s long been known that weight training is an extremely beneficial form of exercise, but more recently experts have been touting that it’s one of the best activities a person can do over a lifetime. Recent studies have even suggested it can improve memory and brain function, strengthen bones and connective tissue in children, help a person quit smoking, and even help breast cancer patients recover more quickly.

Author and health researcher Timothy Caulfield, whom we interviewed earlier this year for his book “The Cure for Everything,” even selected weight training as the one activity he would do to reap the most benefits if he had to choose just one. Knowing he tested every exercise theory out there, we place a fair amount of confidence in his opinion.

And Harvard researchers agree, saying weight training may be as effective at preventing diabetes as other aerobic exercise like walking, swimming and biking.
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Curcumin Spice May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes in Prediabetes Patients

As the number of individuals living with Type 2 diabetes continues to rise, additional means of prevention become all the more crucial. And a recent study from the Srinakharinwirot University of Nakomnayok in Thailand, suggests that a spice called curcumin may be the answer.

Curcumin is a compound in turmeric, a spice in the ginger family that’s most commonly found in Indian cooking. According to an article in Reuters, previous lab work has shown strong evidence that curcumin may help fight both inflammation and oxidative damage to cells – two processes that are thought to feed a variety of diseases, including Type 2 diabetes.

Researchers found that a daily dose of curcumin helped prevent new cases of diabetes develop among people with pre-diabetes, a condition involving high blood sugar levels that may eventually progress to Type 2 diabetes.
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