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diet myths



Eating Late Causes Weight Gain and Other Common Weight Loss Myths

With so many approaches to weight loss out there, it can be difficult to know what to believe when you’re trying to achieve a healthy lifestyle. 

It seems almost every person has their own ‘little secret’ when it comes to dropping the pounds. Even I’ve been duped into believing some weight loss tricks like ‘carbs are the enemy’ and ‘eating late will surely make me fat.’

It’s important to have the facts straight when we’re approaching a healthy lifestyle, and especially weight loss, or else we’ll build false expectations for the results we’ll experience and ultimately become discouraged when they fail us.

Today Show diet and nutrition editor, Madelyn Fernstrom, recently appeared on the show to call fact or fiction on some of the common weight loss myths our society believes – starting with one very hot topic.
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Cool Chicks Know It’s OK to Eat Egg Yolks

Karen Sherwood for Nutritious America

A 44-year-old, weight-obsessed, female client walked into my office with a punch-drunk look on her face. “My doctor says I have high cholesterol”, she said.

I asked her what she’s been eating the last six months. She quickly pulled a list from her doctor out of her purse, detailing all the things she was to omit from her diet. I took it and read, while she scanned my facial expression for reassurance. On this list I saw butter, cheese, red meats, ice-cream, shell-fish, and egg yolks. Then she told me that a typical breakfast for her was three egg whites, a large glass of no-pulp orange juice, vanilla skim latte, and a low-carb bagel. “I stay away from egg yolks all all cost,” she said. Her lunch was typically a 6-inch Subway sandwich, fat-free chips, and a Diet Coke. She told me that sugary sodas and salty chips were necessary for her to beat her typical afternoon slump (along with two more cups of coffee), but they were all “fat-free” so the doctor said it was fine. Later, dinner was a Chinese-chicken salad and a few glasses of wine.

I see this over and over again. It is the situation of a client who has been given partial information. What I don’t understand is, when did something as natural as an egg become villainized and substituted with baked Goldfish crackers in efforts to control cholesterol levels? Sometimes, in an attempt to be healthy, a client can end up causing more harm than good to his or her body. It’s simply a matter of not knowing the facts.

So Let’s Take a Look at the Egg.
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Dr. Oz to Reveal One Day Diet in Good Housekeeping Magazine

In the upcoming April issue of Good Housekeeping magazine, Dr. Mehmet Oz will unveil his newest weight loss wisdom to help readers lose weight forever. His One Day Diet claims that he can help readers lose up to two inches and 10 pounds in four weeks — and stay slim forever.

The Mediterranean style diet allows for a  total of 1,450 calories (300 calories for breakfast, 400 for lunch, 500 for dinner, and 125 for each snack). In the magazine, Dr. Oz provides a 7 day sample diet plan, which allows for meal swaps and includes recipes. In addition to the meal plan, Dr. Oz has 5 simple rules to help you lose 10 pounds in a month. These rules include:

  • Rule 1: Renew Your Vows Daily
  • Rule 2: Do Something Completely Different Every Day
  • Rule 3: Set Your Kitchen on Automatic. Arrange your pantry, fridge, and life so your only choices are good ones.
  • Rule 4: Keep Your Belly Full
  • Rule 5: Extend the Burn


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Uncovering the Biggest Diet and Health Myth on The Doctors

Tune in this Tuesday, November 23 to The Doctors when the most popular diet and health myths are exposed.

On hand to debunk commonly held ideas, like whether celery really does promote weight loss or if sugar really does make kids hyperactive, is Liz Vaccariello, The Doctors’ Health Investigator, author of the Flat Belly Diet and the upcoming 400 Calorie Fix.. On the show, Liz will let you know if there is a diet that makes you smarter, whether it’s OK to eat expired food and much more.
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Vegetarian Diet Myths Debunked

Vegetarianism isn’t just about eating ‘bunny food’ and pounds of tofu everyday. There are a lot of myths surrounding vegetarianism; everything from how healthy going vegetarian really is for the human body all the way down to how to make proper meatless nutrient substitutions. We have compiled a list of the most prevalent vegetarian myths out there and are here to set the record straight.

MYTH: Vegetarians don’t get enough protein.

FACT: Protein doesn’t only come from animal sources. Protein can be found in veg-head-friendly foods like beans, whole grains, and vegetables. Some great sources of protein for vegetarians are tempeh, quinoa, almonds, brown rice, and pinto beans. In addition, most people, vegetarian or not, get more protein than they need in a day, so extra effort to add protein to your diet is usually unnecessary.
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