Author Archives: Jennipher

About Jennipher

A certified personal trainer with a masters in health journalism, Jenn's approach to fitness and health is balanced, fresh, and fun. She's run multiple half marathons (one full!) and seeks solace in 90s pop music.

Get Your Run on With This Running Music Playlist

By Erin Whitehead for

Whether you’re training for a marathon, sprinting to a lover or running from the cops, this hodge-podge running playlist will get you moving. And with a total run time (run time…get it? Ha!) of just less than 37 minutes, it’s the perfect length for any running or jogging workout!



Credit: timtak

Running Music Playlist

1. Running, No Doubt: Warm up with a slow walk, picking up the pace during the choruses.

2. Born to Run, Bruce Springsteen: Although we may not have all been born to run, this tune is perfect for building up to a jog, whether you’re a beginner runner or an Olympic athlete.

3. Ready to Run, Dixie Chicks: When the Dixie Chicks are ready ready ready ready to run, you should run faster, too.

4. Let’s Get It Started, Black Eyed Peas: Let the chorus be your guide. Get a sprint started when the Peas want to “get it started in here” and recover between the choruses.

5. Play, David Banner: Be warned, the explicit version is explicit. Enjoy this steady song and maintain your pace.

6. Break My Stride, Blue Lagoon: This version’s a little more fast-paced than the original, so feel free to pick up the pace again.

7. Runnin’ Down a Dream, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers: Recover from your last push for the first half of this song, then pick up the pace again.

8. Run For Your Life, The Beatles: Pick up the momentum here for a minute, then recover before your last push.

9. Police On My Back, The Clash: Speed up your pace for the last time here, pushing yourself when they start listing all the days of the week they run.

10. Run, Collective Soul: Slow it down, ending on with a walk during this cool-down song. Pat yourself on the back for a run well done!

What’s your favorite song to run to?

Also Read:

25 Best Workout Songs Ever

Fun Summer Workout Playlist

A Glee-themed Workout Playlist


New Cardio Machine Features Soft Platform for a ‘Beach Running’ Feel

Image via The Independent

Running on the beach is one of my favorite things to do. Unfortunately, I live in the Midwest, so my chances to run on a beach are limited to vacations and work trips to the coast. But a new piece of fitness equipment on the market is hoping to bring that beach-running feel to people in all areas, even those in land-locked parts of the country. Recently launched at the IDEA World Fitness Convention in L.A., the Sproing cardio machine uses bungee resistance and a soft platform to create a running experience that is low-impact.

Unlike a treadmill that has a moving platform, the Sproing has no moving pieces. Instead, you wear a chest strap that it attached to a tethered bungee with resistance and run forward, pulling away from the tethered platform as far as you can. Below your feet is a stationary soft platform. Users have two types of surface options to run on. One is filled with air for an easier workout, and one is filled with special high-density foam for a more intense workout that feels like running on the beach. Although there’s no treadmill belt, the Sproing can measure your movement and steps. With custom built-in sensors, it measures your footsteps and tells you how far you’ve run.


5 Tips to Eat Healthy at 100 Montaditos

Have you heard? There’s a new fast-food chain in town: 100 Montaditos. OK, so as of now there’s only one location in the United States (Miami), but the Spanish sandwich chain has the ambitious goal of opening 4,000 restaurants in the next five years. This means that there will be almost as many 100 Montaditos out there as there are Sonic Drive-Ins.

To make sure you’re armed with nutrition knowledge and prepared to eat healthy when you try this new chain, we’ve rounded up the top five tips to eat healthy at 100 Montaditos. Unfortunately, 100 Montaditos doesn’t have its nutritional facts posted online and a quick call in to its Miami location confirmed that nutritional facts are not yet available. In the meantime, here are some guidelines to follow!


60,000 Pounds of Ground Beef Recalled Due to E. Coli

beef-pattiesBefore you cook or grill that ground beef in your fridge for dinner tonight, beware. The USDA has recalled a whopping 60,000 pounds of ground beef due to possible E. Coli contamination.

So far the recall only focuses on the Southeast region of the United States, focusing on products sold mainly in Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, South Carolina and Tennessee. The ground beef was supplied by National Beef Packaging Co. of Dodge City, Kan. and was sold in Winn-Dixie, Publix and Kroger grocery stores.

The USDA says that the tainted beef may be contaminated with E. coli 0157:H7 bacteria, a particularly troubling strain of E. coli. This strain of E. coli can cause bloody diarrhea, dehydration and, in the most severe cases, kidney failure. As with any foodborne illness, the very young, seniors and persons with weak immune systems are the most susceptible, according to the USDA.


How this Heat Wave Affects Our Bodies


To say this summer has been “hot” is a huge understatement. From record-setting temps to weeks upon weeks of weather that’s too hot to be out in let alone work out in, it has truly been the dog days of summer. While we’ve shared lots of ways for you to stay cool in the summer heat, do you really know the reasons why heat is so hard on the human body and how it affects darn near every part of us? Read on for a primer on how this heat wave is affecting our bodies!

Heat and Your Skin

When it’s hot out, your body’s skin works to keep you cool. The skin’s first job when hot is circulating blood to the skin, which increases your skin temperature and allows your body to give off some heat. Next is sweating. Sweating helps you cool off, but when the humidity levels are high and your sweat can’t evaporate, it doesn’t do a whole lot of good and can result in heat rash. Additionally, the extra heat can prompt us to wear less clothing, thereby increasing our risk of sunburn.

What to Do About It: Wear loose-fitting clothing, apply sunscreen to all exposed areas and if you’re in a humid climate, try to be near a fan to help your body evaporate that sweat!


How Much Water Do You Really Need to Drink a Day?

We’ve all heard the rule that we should drink eight, 8-ounce glasses of water each day to stay properly hydrated and healthy. But where did this rule come from? What is the science and research behind the recommendation? Do you need to drink more water if you work out a lot? And what about the foods, like soup and grapefruit, that have a lot of water in them? Do they count towards your daily water-total?

drinking-waterA new commentary in the British Medical Journal, where a doctor called the recommendation to drink six to eight glasses of water a day, “thoroughly debunked nonsense,” is causing many to question what had been considered hydration-law. To clear this whole water-recommendation thing up, we talked with some experts about hydration to get the real deal on how much you really need to drink.

Do I Need to Drink Eight Glasses of Water a Day?

Basically, there is no one-size-fits-all approach when it comes to optimal hydration, says Dr. Josh Wagner, owner of The Life House on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, where he practices chiropractic and sports medicine.

“Eight cups of water per day is the classic recommendation for keeping hydrated, but how could, say, a 105-pound woman need to consume the same amount of water as a 240-pound man?” Dr. Wagner asks. “I usually advise my patients to drink at least half their body weight in ounces of water per day, and to add even more water if they tend to enjoy caffeinated beverages or alcohol or if they have other health concerns, such as diabetes. You’ve heard it before, but water makes up such a large percentage of our bodies and is one of the most important parts of a healthy lifestyle.”


Your Personal Trainer Isn’t Really That Different From You

I recently stumbled upon a very interesting article: “9 Secrets Your Personal Trainer Doesn’t Want You to Know.” As a certified personal trainer myself, I read through each “secret,” mostly nodding my head. Because – believe it or not – they’re mostly true. Maybe they’re not all true for me personally as a trainer, but I can easily attribute them to other trainers – both good ones and not-so-good ones- I’ve worked with.

I know a number of trainers who have relied on coffee and cigarettes to stave off hunger in order to fit in a smaller-sized workout pant. I know a lot of trainers who work out hard, and often play hard — pounding beers and pizza most of the weekend. There are definitely trainers who dial up the customer service for higher-profile clients, and I’d be remiss to not admit that some clients I’ve had myself didn’t really need me to get a good workout. Also, believe me that all trainers hate it when you cancel an appointment at the last minute, even if you do pay for the session.

Surprised? Don’t be. Personal trainers really aren’t that different from you. Sure, they have more workout experience and knowledge than you do, and them standing there with that clipboard and correcting your form makes them seem like they’re superhuman sometimes, but they have a lot of the same health and wellness hang-ups and struggles that you probably do.


Exercising on an Empty Stomach: Good or Bad for Burning Fat?

Healthy BreakfastsYou’ve probably heard the claim that exercising on an empty stomach helps boost fat loss. But is there any truth to it? While the answer depends on who you talk to (and what book you read — so many weight-loss books promote the practice), most research studies and exercise science experts agree that fasting before working out is counterproductive.

Working out on an empty stomach makes sense — in theory. Proponents say that you’ll burn more fat because your body doesn’t have carbohydrates to use as energy since you haven’t eaten. However, a February 2011 report published in Strength and Conditioning Journal found that to be untrue. Researchers found that when you don’t have proper fuel in your body, your body has less energy and therefore your exercise intensity and number of calories burned suffers. During intense workouts, your body may actually pull protein from your muscle for fuel — definitely counterproductive since muscle helps to rev metabolism.


New Wedges Make Exercise a Little Easier for Beginners

fitness-wedgesOne of the most common complaints I hear from beginner exercisers is that their knees, wrists or necks feel uncomfortable — or even painful — during common moves like push-ups, planks and ab work. When you’re just starting a new workout program, there’s already enough things to deal with, from making room in your schedule for exercise to properly hydrating to having the right form to delayed onset muscle soreness. The last thing you need is extra discomfort, right? Right!

The company Do or Die Fitness recently sent me their new fitness wedges for just this problem. Made of soft yet supportive latex-free foam, the wrist wedges, neck circle and knee donuts are a new exerciser’s BFF. All of the supports reduce discomfort and stress on your joints by improving your ergonomics. I was especially a fan of the knee donuts. Whether it’s being in table-top position in yoga that’s uncomfortable or doing a modified push-up that puts too much pressure on your knees, these little donuts do wonders. The wrist wedges were also easy to use, even including a little diagram of where your hand goes, so that you use them correctly. The neck circle was my least favorite of the three, but it wasn’t because it didn’t work — it did its job. I just feel like, for neck support, you could easily use a towel, pillow or something else that’s soft you have around the house. (more…)

Jazzercise vs. Zumba: Which Is Right for You?

Dance-based group exercise classes can be a blast. If you’re someone who loves to dance but hates to “go to the gym,” these classes can be fun, high-energy and, really, not feel like a workout at all. Now there are a number of dance-based classes and DVDs out there, but two of the most popular types of classes are Jazzercise and Zumba. Both types of workouts have similarities yet also they have their differences. Not sure which one is right for you? Read on to see which class is best!


This is a tricky question because both Zumba and Jazzercise classes are run by independent contractors, meaning that the price can vary widely depending on where you live and who you are taking the class from. Both kinds of classes are sometimes offered for free or for a small additional cost with a health-club membership. Other times, you can pay as little as $10 a class to take them at a facility without a membership. Many times you can also take classes at dance studios and although they charge a little bit more ($15+), the instruction is usually at a bit higher level. Both also offer workout DVDs.

Who wins this one? Because prices vary so widely according to location and facility, it’s a tie when it comes to classes! However, when it comes to buying workout DVDs, Jazzercise is considerably cheaper at just $16.99 for a DVD, compared with $89.95 for a set of Zumba DVDs (while the price per DVD is cheaper with the Zumba DVD set, generally the workouts on the Zumba DVDs are shorter, thereby giving you less workout time for your money).