Diets in Review - Find the Right Diet for You

3 Meals That are Cheap and Healthy

By Janis Jibrin, M.S., R.D., TheBestLife.com lead nutritionist

Feeling like you’re about to go off your own fiscal cliff after all that holiday spending? No need to settle for cheap junk food to help pay down your credit card bills. The truth is, some of the least expensive foods are also the healthiest.

Here’s my core budget-but-healthy shopping list. (Check out my blog for more lower-cost items.)

Canned beans – dried are even less expensive, but require you to plan ahead
Canned tomatoes – no salt added (the store brand is cheapest)
Canned wild salmon and canned light “chunk” tuna
Dried herbs – whatever is on sale
Fresh fruit – whatever is on sale
Fresh vegetables – whatever is on sale
Oatmeal or steel-cut oats – large carton of plain oats (the store brand is usually cheapest)
Peanut butter
Tofu – for cooking pointers, click here.

The following meals use some of the items listed above. All three of these dollar-stretching dishes are also seriously nutritious.  I calculated the cost of each meal using prices at my local Giant supermarket in Washington D.C.; prices may vary in your area.

Oatmeal with Banana and Milk

Cost:  $ 0.77

How to: Cook ½ cup oatmeal according to package directions. Add a sliced banana, either during or after cooking. Serve with a cup of fat-free milk (or turn the milk into a latte).

Peanut Butter and Banana Sandwich with Milk
Cost: $ 1.11

How to: Spread 2 slices of whole-wheat bread with 1 tablespoon of peanut butter per slice. Top 1 slice with banana slices and cover with the other slice. Have the rest of the banana separately, along with a glass of fat-free milk.

Chickpea and Tomato Curry
Cost: $1.29 per serving

How to: You’ll have this vegetarian curry recipe ready to enjoy in just 30 minutes, thanks to the simple recipe linked above. Use canned chickpeas and fresh flavor agents like ginger, garlic, and onion with curry powder for a big, bold, affordable meal.

Also Read:

Challenge: Buy 30 Days of Whole Foods Groceries on a Poverty-Level Budget

5 Places People Waste the Most Money on Their Health

Buying Organic Doesn’t Have to Break the Bank

February 15th, 2013

> Leave Feedback

User Feedback

(Page 0 of 1, 0 total comments)

There is no user feedback yet, leave yours below!


   
 

Leave Feedback

Skip the moderation queue by becoming a MyDIR member.

Already a member?

Need to sign up?
It’s free and only it takes a minute.
There are two ways to join:


Or, proceed without an account