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The PCOS Diet Plan

Treat PCOS symptoms and get healthy with this diet plan.

BACKGROUND Start the Diet Now Advertisement

The PCOS Diet Plan is a new book that covers a natural approach to health for women with polycystic ovary syndrome, or PCOS. This book was written by Hillary Wright and highlights a way of eating that can help those who suffer from polycystic ovary syndrome. This disease is the most common hormonal disorder of women who are of reproductive age. It can lead to other serious diseases like type 2 diabetes, infertility, heart disease and even endometrial cancer. This diet plan is a change in lifestyle using a type of symptom management that Wright developed when working with patients. The PCOS Diet Plan will tell you exactly what exercises, supplements and other choices you can make that will help you feel better.

Through a combination of diet, nutrition and medication, you can learn how to properly treat PCOS with this book. It teaches you not only to eat properly but also to incorporate exercise. You will not only be treating your disease but also gaining a healthier body and reducing the risk of heart disease and diabetes. The PCOS Diet Plan offers relief and a plan so you don’t have to simply suffer through the disease without any help.

PRO
  • Specific plan for those that have PCOS
  • Offers prevention to other serious diseases
  • Incorporates both diet and exercise
  • Help for the most common disease among reproductive aged women
  • Program is effective and has been used effectively by hundreds of patients
  • Includes details on specific vitamins the body needs
  • Encourages an eating plan that keeps your heart healthy
  • Offers info on the proper amount of exercise needed to lose weight and maintain weight loss
CON
  • Plan is for women only due to PCOS being a gender specific disease
DIET and NUTRITION

The diet within The PCOS Diet Plan offers lots of information on vitamins and supplements that are needed and why they are important to a woman’s body. Calcium is one very important part of the diet and the book includes a thorough chart with foods that are great sources of calcium. You are also given information on how to choose a daily supplement. The diet that is recommended within the book is known as the DASH diet. DASH stands for dietary approaches to stop hypertension. Although the diet is known for helping lower your risk for heart disease, it is also a solid plan used to keep your heart healthy.

Sodium is limited to 2,300 milligrams per day with the DASH diet. If followed this diet can help you lower your blood pressure in as little as two weeks. The diet is low in fat, saturated fat and cholesterol. Fruits and vegetables along with low-fat or fat free dairy products are encouraged. The DASH diet also includes whole grains, fish, poultry and small amounts of nuts and seeds. About 55 percent of your daily calories will come from carbohydrates on this plan. Breakfast is highlighted as very important to get your body fueled for the day. If consuming 1,600 calories per day, you might have a breakdown like the one listed below. With this type of caloric intake each day, most women would see some form of weight loss.

  • Grains – six servings per day
  • Vegetables – three to four servings per day
  • Fruits – four servings per day
  • Fat-free or 1 percent milk products – two to three servings per day
  • Lean meat, poultry or fish – three to six ounces per day
  • Nuts, seeds and legumes – three servings per week
  • Fats and oils – two servings
  • Sweets and added sugars - zero
EXERCISE

Exercise is essential to The PCOS Diet Plan. The plan has you first figure out what level you are at in terms of fitness, and then gives advice on how to go to the next level to increase your fitness. There are four total levels including inactive, low, medium and high. The determining factor for what level you are at depends on how many minutes you spend participating in health-enhancing activities each week. These types of activities include brisk walking, jogging, swimming, dancing, lifting weights and yoga. The book also gives suggestions for activities you can do at each level so you’re not taking on too much at once. To receive constant benefit from the exercise you’re doing, you should strive for at least 150 minutes per week of moderate intensity aerobic activities. This would put you at the medium level according to the book. If your goal is to lose weight and prevent your body from regaining the weight, you would shoot for 300 minutes or more of moderate activity per week. That averages out to 60 minutes five days per week. This puts you in the high level of physical activity according to the book. For those looking to reach the high level of activity (300 minutes) each week, there are some suggestions listed below:

  • 45 minutes of brisk walking daily; using resistance bands on two days
  • 60 minutes of doubles tennis on two days; 60 minutes of brisk walking on three days; weight machines on two days
  • 45 minutes of stationary bike on two days; 45 minutes of water aerobics one day; 30 minutes of bicycling on two days; 60 minutes of general gardening on one day; 30 minutes of brisk walking on two days with resistance bands on two days
CONCLUSION

The PCOS Diet Plan is designed for those suffering from polycystic ovary syndrome, but it offers a solid diet and exercise plan that anyone could follow to lose weight. For those that do have PCOS, there is a wealth of information on the disease itself as well as the best ways to treat it. By following this plan you can help ease some of your symptoms and prevent other diseases such as heart disease and diabetes. You control what results you’d like to get but the tools are given to you to make that happen.

Common Misspellings

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(Page 1 of 1, 3 total comments)

Deziree

I'm concerned that this diet for PCOS suggests dairy. All Mammalian breast milk contains IGF-1 (Insulin-like growth hormone) and increases the insulin effects in your body [and on your ovaries].

posted May 29th, 2013 5:36 am


Mary

Your 1 hour of walking a day = 410 minutes a week. The book suggests 300 minutes and the review just gives a list of possibly exercise routines. Nothing excessive there. Read closely. The book also follows pretty closely to your standard low-glycemic index diet, which can be a good place to begin for pcos sufferers showing signs insulin resistance.

Since PCOS is often used as a blanket diagnosis, the same "plan" will never work for everyone. Most don't even have the same symptoms...or even have ovarian cysts! Yes, laying off processed food will help anyone feel better (even those without PCOS), but following someone else's plan is not going to guarantee success.

You also have to adjust every diet or eating style to your own unique tastes or you will NEVER stick to it. Same goes for exercise, you have to find activities that YOU like, or you will NEVER keep it up.

posted Dec 28th, 2012 9:23 pm



amsbuddy

I have had PCOS for 22 years and I can tell you that for one thing, the exercise recommended here is totally excessive. I walk for one hour a day and that alone keeps the weight off. I have been doing this for 8 years and haven't gained an ounce. This is also because of my diet which is pure food, whole food, natural organic food, nothing processed. I feel it is very bad that in this diet review (above) there is no sample diet food menu listed so users could know what a typical day is like. I can only tell you what my typical day is like: For breakfast I usually have natural oatmeal (no sugar) with nuts and dried fruit plus a Tbl of cream. Either that or I eat whole grain toast with almond butter. I also eat bacon & eggs for breakfast on occasion. I have low blood pressure and my doctor told me to incorporate more protein into my diet, which is not a bad thing for PCOS sufferers. For lunch I usually have a big romaine or spinach salad topped with either tuna or grilled chicken, plus parmesan or feta cheese, tomatoes, beans, and EVOO + vinegar. For dinner I usually eat steak, fish, turkey, pork, chicken, or ground beef with either rice or a sweet potato, plus half a plate of steamed fresh vegetables. I drink whole milk. Anything less is incredibly bad for you. Do your research on this and you'll see what I mean. If I snack on something, it is either yogurt, cottage cheese, fresh fruit or vegetables (or V8 juice), or nuts. No peanuts! If I crave something sweet, I have coffee + a little creamer or ONE piece of dessert. 2 small oatmeal cookies are ok. I drink green tea and water a lot. You have to walk every day as long as you can, hopefully with an ipod. If you do that, you can eat what I eat and still lose weight. Keep portions small. You can always go back for more. I hope this is helpful.

posted Dec 19th, 2012 10:25 am



   
 

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