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Xenical



Warning Alli Linked to Liver Damage

Warning to all consumers of Alli and Xenical: The FDA has linked the weight loss pills to severe liver damage in certain rare cases.

“The Food and Drug Administration said Wednesday it has added a warning about the risk to the label of the drug, which is sold over-the-counter by GlaxoSmithKline. A prescription version called Xenical is manufactured by Roche and sold by Glaxo.”

Currently the FDA has identified 13 confirmed cases of liver damage linked to Alli and Xenical. Xenical has been on the market since 1997 and available via doctor’s prescription. Alli, a newer consumer version of the weight loss drug, has been available over-the-counter since 2007.

Alli, which had sales nearing 300 million dollars in 2009, has been performing below Wall Street estimates. Poor sales of the lifestyle drug can be attributed to poor economic conditions as well as unpleasant side effects, such as anal leakage.

Doctors urge patients taking these weight loss pills to monitor signs of liver injury, including itching, yellow eyes and skin and loss of appetite.

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FDA Looks Into Alli and Xenical Liver Damage Concerns

alli and xenicalNew research shows concern that two popular weight loss drugs, Alli and Xenical, may cause liver damage. On Monday, August 24, 2009, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) began investigating recent reports that these drugs may be causing liver damage in those who take them.

To date, there have been 30 reported cases of liver damage by those who take Alli, the only non-prescription weight loss drug the FDA has approved, and Xenical, its prescription counterpart. Of the 30 reports, 27 individuals have been hospitalized and six of them have experienced liver failure.

Both drugs are marketed by British drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline PLC, but Xenical is manufactured by pharmaceutical giant Roche.
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Does Taking Xenical Make You Eat Worse?

xenicalA new study is suggesting that the diet drug Orlistat, more popularly known under its prescription name Xenical, doesn’t help people improve their eating habits. But it’s even being suggested that it has the opposite effect.

When Xenical works, it blocks the absorption of fat in the intestines. Users are advised to reduce their dietary fat intake, consuming no more than 30 percent of their calories from fat each day.

This is what The Diet Blog has to say:

A new study suggests the popular diet drug Orlistat… doesn’t inspire people to improve their diets, instead individuals popping Xenical are more likely to eat worse. How’s that for irony.
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