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World Vegetarian Day



Celebrating World Vegetarian Day with a Look at Types of Vegetarianism

Today, October 1st, is World Vegetarian Day. It was established in 1977, “To promote the joy, compassion and lief-enhancing possibilities of vegetarianism.” In honor of this day, we’re taking a look at the different types of diets that promote the reduction of meat consumption. There are many different reasons why people choose to abstain from eating meat, from health concerns to ethical and religious reasons. It’s not surprising that there are many different types of vegetarians. In the slide show below, we take a look at different levels of giving up meat, including flexitarians, pescetarians, and freegans.

View Degrees of Vegetarianism Slideshow


Celebrate National Vegetarian Awareness Month By Improving Your Health

October 1st marked the start of National Vegetarian Awareness Month, and whether you are a full-blown vegetarian, or simply understand the important role fresh fruits and veggies play in your overall health, everyone can enjoy the benefits of taking a few days off meat.

A diet full of fresh fruits and vegetables, and one that eliminates meat and animal proteins that are high in saturated fat and raised on chemicals is hard to argue with. In addition, those who follow a vegetarian diet, on average, have lower cholesterol levels, lower blood pressure and a lower incidence of obesity.
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Vegetarian Diet Myths Debunked

Vegetarianism isn’t just about eating ‘bunny food’ and pounds of tofu everyday. There are a lot of myths surrounding vegetarianism; everything from how healthy going vegetarian really is for the human body all the way down to how to make proper meatless nutrient substitutions. We have compiled a list of the most prevalent vegetarian myths out there and are here to set the record straight.

MYTH: Vegetarians don’t get enough protein.

FACT: Protein doesn’t only come from animal sources. Protein can be found in veg-head-friendly foods like beans, whole grains, and vegetables. Some great sources of protein for vegetarians are tempeh, quinoa, almonds, brown rice, and pinto beans. In addition, most people, vegetarian or not, get more protein than they need in a day, so extra effort to add protein to your diet is usually unnecessary.
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