Diets in Review - Find the Right Diet for You

whole grain



Anti-Inflammatory Diet: Secret to Disease-Free Living

Inflammation is a major health problem, particularly as we get older. The term “inflammation” refers to a pretty broad spectrum of health issues, including symptoms such as pain, swelling, and redness of an affected organ or tissue.

So, where does diet come into play? Well, a poor diet can cause chronic inflammation, which could lead to arthritis and various auto-immune diseases. Proponents also point to the growing evidence that long-term inflammation can lead to some cancers, heart disease, high blood pressure and even Alzheimer’s disease.

The key may be in a hormone called prostaglandins. These hormones are produced to regulate our body’s inflammatory response and come from the fats we eat. There is evidence that shows that the types of prostaglandins produced in our body can depend on the types of fat eat. So, in order to adhere to an anti-inflammatory diet, you need to stick with eating “good” fats and avoid “bad” ones.
Read Full Post >



January 28 is National Blueberry Pancake Day

Pancakes might be delicious, but they aren’t usually billed as one of the most nutritious foods. You can up the health value of your favorite flapjacks by using wheat flour instead of white flour and today, National Blueberry Pancake Day, add some berries for an extra nutrient boost.

While most of us love to eat pancakes, many of us aren’t quite sure how to cook them with prowess.

The first step is choosing the right equipment. The key to a perfect pancake? The pan. Choose a pan that has an advanced nonstick surface that is durable and metal utensil safe, so foods that are prone to sticking, like pancakes, easily slide off, even when little or no butter or oil is used.


Read Full Post >



America’s Greatest Chefs are Keen on Quinoa

Packed with protein and hundreds of years of wisdom, quinoa may be not only one of the most practical ingredients a chef can use, but also one of the most devious, for it has been fooling us all for hundreds of years.  This tiny ingredient, usually assumed to be a grain, isn’t really that at all—it’s a seed.

Though it leads a life of deceit and disguise, this unassuming ingredient can make a bold impact on a dish when prepared well.  And it’s a feel good ingredient, too, packed with 12-18% protein and containing a balanced set of essential amino acids.  Today, some of the most progressive chefs are keen on quinoa, and share suggestions for incorporating this once-sacred ancient plant in your own dishes:



Bread Battle: Sprouted-Grain vs. Whole-Wheat

BreadIs sprouted grain bread better for you than whole wheat? The Nutrition Lab at the Los Angeles Times weighs in: only a little. While both breads are substantially more nutritious than white bread, the nutritional differences between sprouted grain bread and whole wheat bread is minimal.

Whole-wheat bread is made from wheat kernels that are ground into flour. The flour in white bread is made from just the endosperm of the wheat kernel. The wheat lacks the germ and shell, and is therefore stripped of much of its nutrient.

In sprouted-grain bread, the wheat kernels are allowed to sprout before they are ground down and then baked into bread. Because the sprouted grains are not made into flour, this type of bread is sometimes call “flowerless”–although it still contains gluten. Sprouted-grain bread can be made from a variety of sprouts, including millet, oat or soy.


Read Full Post >



Quick, Healthy Breakfast Ideas for Every Schedule

Pamela Ofstein is the Director of Nutrition Services at eDiets.com, a leading provider of weight loss services, information and products.

I have three kids, a husband and myself (oh wait, my dog, too!) to get ready first thing in the morning and out the door – it’s utter chaos! There are many days that I get so wrapped up in the hustle that I am half-way to work before realizing I didn’t eat breakfast!

You probably heard your parents say, “Breakfast is the most important meal of the day.” Well, they were right! Why, you ask? Research has shown that men and women who eat breakfast every day are far less likely to become obese, compared to those who skip the first meal of the day.

Breakfast helps to fuel your body for the start of the day, so it’s important to choose nutrient-dense foods to fill your tank! It doesn’t have to be a huge fare. A simple meal containing a balance of complex carbs, protein and healthy fats is usually a good combination.


Read Full Post >