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weight training

Strength Training May Help Prevent Diabetes, Study Shows

A study that’s been nearly two decades in the making is shining some new light on the benefits of weight training. Researchers from the Harvard University of Public Health have found that this popular form of exercise not only provides bigger biceps, but may also help prevent Type 2 diabetes.

It’s long been known that weight training is an extremely beneficial form of exercise, but more recently experts have been touting that it’s one of the best activities a person can do over a lifetime. Recent studies have even suggested it can improve memory and brain function, strengthen bones and connective tissue in children, help a person quit smoking, and even help breast cancer patients recover more quickly.

Author and health researcher Timothy Caulfield, whom we interviewed earlier this year for his book “The Cure for Everything,” even selected weight training as the one activity he would do to reap the most benefits if he had to choose just one. Knowing he tested every exercise theory out there, we place a fair amount of confidence in his opinion.

And Harvard researchers agree, saying weight training may be as effective at preventing diabetes as other aerobic exercise like walking, swimming and biking.
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Health Buzz June 15: Yoga Barbie Controversy, Worst Grilled Foods, Dad’s Weekend Recipes

Yoga Teacher Barbie Bends Children’s Advocates Out of Shape

Add yoga teacher to Barbie’s list of careers. Mattel added yoga Barbie to their exclusive line “I Can Be…”,  which is supposed to inspire girls to strive for more than just the ordinary. Once again Barbie stirs up controversy and we hear from people on both sides of the argument.

A Carrot Had More Nutrients 50 Years Ago Than it Does Today

Nutrition from your fruits and veggies isn’t going away, but studies show that there were more nutrients in them years ago than today. The environment is responsible for less nutrients in your fruits and vegetables. But don’t shy away from these essentials because those guys still pack a punch when it comes to nutrition.

Zero Weights, Zero Problem: Strength Training Without Weights

Can’t get to the gym or don’t have your own weights at home? That’s no excuse to skip strength training. We show you a variety of moves that rely on your own body weight to get toned.
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Lift Weights or Die (Sooner and Weaker)

“We’ve seen research on every age group, from children to men and women in their 90s, and it’s clear that you can get stronger at any age,” says Lou Schuler, co-author of the new book The New Rules of Lifting for Life.

This intriguing new book draws out long known truths about muscle strength and longevity. Simply put, the book explains how the strongest people live longer. Additionally the book explains smart and healthy ways for anyone to get in the weight room and get an effective workout.

The authors call-out some common problems seen by many who frequent the gym. For instance, they dispel the myth that women don’t need to lift heavy weights.

“Middle-aged and older women think their bones will shatter if they pick up a weight that’s heavier than their purse. There’s nothing stranger than seeing a woman do a bench press or bent-over row with a dumbbell that’s smaller than her forearm,” Schuler says.

Schuler explains how another common error to be found in the weight room is that of overweight individuals.
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New Study Shows Light and Heavy Weight Lifting Yield Same Results

If you knew that lifting heavy weights wasn’t necessary to build muscle, would you drop those 50 pound dumbbells and swap them for 25s?

Well according to a new study published in the Journal of Applied Physiology, you don’t have to lift heavy weights to build muscle strength – that light weights can be just as effective at building muscle if you do it correctly. Plus, you’re much less prone to injury that way. So you might be able to lighten your load after all.

This is important news for people seeking to remain healthy and active we’ll into their later years because it makes the task of maintaining muscle tone far less daunting. While cardiovascular exercise is important, it’s simply not enough to maintain muscle mass – some resistance training is required.

So just how much light lifting do you have to do to meet the goal? Based on prior studies, about 30 percent of your maximum effort until you reach fatigue.
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Type 1 Diabetics Should Lift Weights Before Cardio

by Arleigh Aldrich

New studies conducted by Canadian researchers have found that those with type 1 diabetes may have an easier time managing their blood sugar levels if they lift weights before doing cardiovascular exercise.

Type 1 diabetes patients suffer from deficiencies in insulin, which the body needs to turn food into fuel. Without insulin, glucose from food remains in the blood and can cause harm to other organs in the body. Insulin can be regulated in type 1 diabetes patients through insulin injections or pumps. Only about 5% (1.3 million) of American diabetes patients suffer from type 1. Patients with type 2 diabetes account for the majority of diabetes patients in America. Those with type 2 produce insulin, however the body does not respond to it. Insulin must be injected directly into fat under the skin for the blood to absorb it.

Muscles utilize sugar fast in highly aerobic exercise, depleting blood sugar levels quicker than non-cardio workouts. What the experiment found was by lifting weights first, blood sugar levels remained above the minimum threshold for someone with type 1 diabetes. Furthermore, levels remained above the threshold for longer periods of time after the workout was completed.

Dr. Ronald Sigal is a lead author on the study and endocronologist at the University of Calgary in Canada. Sigal told Reuters Health, “It’s important to define the best way for people with type 1 diabetes to exercise so that blood sugar doesn’t drop too low, yet they can still reap all the benefits of aerobic exercise.”

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