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5 Ways to Fuel up for Exercise

By Team Best Life – TheBestLife.com

It may seem counterintuitive to take in calories before you head to the gym to burn them off, but eating a healthy bite beforehand can help you make the most of your workout. No matter what kind of activity you’re planning, you can use these tips to fuel up for fitness:


Eat when it feels best. Eating one hour before your workout is a good general rule, but everyone’s body is different. For instance, some people may feel uncomfortable or bloated trying to exercise after a snack or meal while others may be distracted by a rumbling tummy. Only you know exactly how much you can comfortably eat and how soon before your workout.

Keep track of carbs. Because glucose—a carbohydrate—is your muscles’ preferred source of fuel, you need to go into a workout with enough stored glucose (aka glycogen). If you eat a balanced diet, you should be all set. But if you’re hitting the gym hours after your last meal or snack, you might need a little carb boost; 15 grams should do the trick.
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Lose 7 Pounds a Year from Drinking Cold Water

Did you know it matters if you drink cold water versus warm water? It seems like there are always tips and tricks when it comes to losing weight. One of the tips I’ve heard is to drink water before you eat and there are a few proven reasons on why this is true. The first reason is that sometimes when your body is dehydrated it confuses the signal of being thirsty for hunger. The signal is sent to your brain and as a result you feel like eating. If it’s actually because you’re dehydrated, drinking a glass of water will help alleviate the urge to eat something.

The second reason to drink water before you eat a meal is because it will make you feel more full. You may have heard this already but do you know whether you should drink cold or warm water? If you are wanting to feel full for longer, you will want to drink room temperature or warm water. Warm water tends to stay in the stomach longer than cold water. The reason for this is because when you drink cold water, it has to leave the stomach faster so your body can heat it up quickly. So when choosing between the two, go for warm water.

Another trick I’ve heard over the years is that drinking ice cold water makes your body burn more calories. Is this fact or fiction?
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How Much Water Is Enough? The New Rules for Hydration

You’ve heard it been said that we should drink a lot more water than we currently do in order to stay hydrated, since our bodies are made up of 80 percent water and need tons of the stuff to function properly. But what if this notion is false? What if we’re all looking like overzealous idiots carrying around our 82 ounce Nalgene bottles in an effort to stave off dehydration?

While experts typically recommend that we aim for 2.5 liters of water a day – or roughly eight glasses – new insight from an article published in the Australian public health journal is arguing otherwise, saying that the necessity for 64 ounces of water a day is a flat-out myth.

The primary message of the new research is this: While drinking a lot of water has been shown to decrease appetite, the authors of the article contend that consuming foods with a high water content promotes even more weight loss than just plain water. And in addition, they argue that our bodies are likely getting the hydration they need from the fluids we take in in addition to water- including coffee, tea, and even beer.
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Water is Good For You, but it Won’t Flush Away Fat

If you mention weight loss it seems a million “tips” or “pieces of advice” come flying out of the woodwork. There’s many of them out there like, “Don’t eat after such and such time,” “Stop eating bread and carbs,” or “Eat eight tiny meals a day.” Most of this can be overturned and found to be another empty promise of how to lose weight. One myth that seems to be pushed is about how water has the power to flush out fat from the body. Sadly, it seems this may be just another myth.

The myth is often stated that, “drinking eight glasses of water a day flushes out fat.” Truth is, that’s simply not true.

“…There’s no magic about drinking water,” says Sue Gebo, RD, MPH, an assistant professor at the University of Connecticut School of Medicine.

Gebo explains that water cannot flush away fat, that is just a hopeful myth. While water can not perform this trick, a Virginia Tech University study explains how this myth may have started.

The study found that people who drank 16 ounces of water prior to eating a meal actually consumed 75 to 95 fewer calories than the control group. Both groups in the study were on prescribed low-calorie diets and on average the water drinkers lost more weight, 4.5 pounds more than the non-water drinkers.
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The Alkaline Water Fight: Is it Healthy or Not?

Alkaline water seems to be causing quite a stir in the health field, with those in favor and opposed both passionately arguing their sides – one claiming it provides amazing health benefits, and the other arguing it’s a complete hoax. But to gain a better understanding of what exactly alkaline water is, we did some research and consulted several health professionals to shine better light on this supposed miracle beverage.

What is it? Alklaine water has a higher pH level than regular tap water, which is why proponents say it can help neutralize acid in your bloodstream, boost your metabolism, and help your body absorb nutrients more effectively. But according to Mayo Clinic Nutritionist Katherine Zeratsky, RD, none of these health claims have been scientifically proven, and she recommends plains water as the best option for most people.

Proposed benefits: Since alkaline water supposedly contains healthy ionized minerals like calcium, magnesium and potassium, it’s thought to help reduce risk of suffering from symptoms of metabolic syndrome, including high blood pressure, elevated blood sugar levels, high cholesterol and kidney stones.

It’s also thought to have antioxidant properties and potentially reduce rates of heart disease, promote healthy weight loss, and improve bone density. But there doesn’t seem to be any scientific evidence to back these arguments up, leaving us to conclude that these are all just claims.
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