Diets in Review - Find the Right Diet for You

walnuts



How to Cook for Heart Health

February is National Heart Health Month, making it the perfect time to highlight some foods that promote heart health, as well as list those that do more harm than good.

While heart disease can be hereditary, its prevention begins with a healthy lifestyle. For starters, this means no smoking, monitoring your blood sugar and blood pressure levels, and incorporating exercise and a healthy, well-balanced diet into your everyday routine. 

Diet alone can play a huge role in heart disease prevention. In general, heart healthy foods are ones that are natural, whole foods that don’t come in a box and instead come straight from nature. Fresh fruits and vegetables are certainly a cornerstone of heart-healthy foods for their high nutrient and vitamin content and their amazing ability to cleanse free radicals from the blood stream.
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Walnuts May Prevent Breast Cancer

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in the United States. While it’s often very treatable when caught early enough, the best thing is to find ways to avoid it altogether. One way is to consider what you eat. Recent research has found that consuming walnuts may be a way of preventing breast cancer.

Researchers examines the effects of a diet containing a small amount of walnuts over the lifespan of mice. It was the equivalent of two ounces daily for humans. What they observed was the walnuts slowed the development and growth of breast cancer tumors in the mice.

“We think now that diet can prevent 30 to 60 percent of all cancers,” said lead researcher Elaine Hardman, Ph.D., professor at Marshall University’s Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine. “The healthy diet that we should be eating is what we know is healthy – a lot of fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains and nuts. Walnuts can be an important component of that diet.”
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Top 10 Foods for Better Brain Health

Michael Gonzalez-Wallace is the author of Super Body, Super Brain. You can read more from him at www.superbodysuperbrain.com or pick up his book Super Body, Super Brain.

Who doesn’t want to get smarter? Who wants to look better or be healthier? Many recent studies have shown how specific nutrients have positive effects on the brain especially in those areas of the brain related to cognitive processing or feelings and emotions. Generally speaking, you want to follow a healthy diet for your brain that will lead to good blood flow, help maintain mental sharpness and reduce the risk of heart disease and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and dementia.

We know how foods play a great role in our brain. This is the conclusion of several studies led by a phenomenal neuroscientist at UCLA, Gomez Pinilla.

According to one study, the super fats your brain needs most are Omega 3 fatty acids. Your brain converts them into DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) which enhances neuronal communication and promotes neuronal growth.


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Benefits of Walnuts Uncovered by New Research

Shelled WalnutA new scientific study presented at the American Chemical Society meeting in Anaheim found that walnuts outrank other tree and ground nuts in nutritional value. The analysis showed that walnuts have more antioxidants of a higher quality than any other nut.

“Walnuts rank above peanuts, almonds, pecans, pistachios and other nuts,” said Joe Vinson, Ph.D., who did the analysis. “A handful of walnuts contains almost twice as much antioxidants as an equivalent amount of any other commonly consumed nut. But unfortunately, people don’t eat a lot of them. This study suggests that consumers should eat more walnuts as part of a healthy diet.”


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Your Guide to Good and Bad Fats

The American vocabulary uses “fat” as a negative adjective when actually, some fat is beneficial to your health. When it comes to diet, certain types of dietary fat an aid weight loss and help improve bodily functions.

The Harvard School of Public Health says to avoid trans-fats, limit saturated fats and choose healthy fats. What are healthy fats, you may ask? The “good fats” include monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, which have been said to help lower disease risk.


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