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ulcerative colitis



Parasitic Worms Said to Heal Ulcerative Colitis, But Doctors Aren’t Convinced

You’ve heard about the tapeworm diet, right? Besides allowing the host to lose weight, a few rogue scientists also believe that tapeworms may help with allergy symptoms and intestinal diseases. Unfortunately, the possible benefits of playing host to an intestinal parasite come at a very high cost and most doctors highly discourage it.

A man known only to the public as ‘the patient’ was faced with the stark reality that little could be done for his severe ulcerative colitis. There was one treatment left to try, but with only a 50 percent success rate and serious complications, the patient felt that there had to be other options. He began researching alternative therapies and came across a controversial idea about intestinal parasites eliminating colitis. According to CNN, U.S. doctors refused to entertain his wild idea and told him if he pursued it outside of the country than he would be on his own. After much deliberation, he went ahead and found a doctor in Thailand who was willing to help.


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Introduction to the Specific Carb Diet

Honey: The only sweetener allowed with the Specific Carb Diet

The Specific Carb Diet was originally created by Dr. Sidney V. Haas more than 60 years ago to treat digestive disorders such as Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, chronic diarrhea, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). It is now being used to treat autism spectrum disorders, celiac disease and cystic fibrosis. It is not a low-carb diet like Atkins. Many find it very restrictive; however, those who experience the health benefits are committed to strict adherence. It is more restrictive and specific than a gluten-free diet. Because it can be overwhelming, I think it is helpful to present the “allowed” foods first.

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Fried and Fatty Food May Cause Ulcerative Colitis

cheeseburgerWe all know about the bad health affects of fried foods and too much red meat. But now those foods may be responsible for developing the serious bowel condition known as ulcerative colitis.

Researchers found a connection between linoleic acid, a type of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid found in red meat and fried foods, and ulcerative colitis. More specifically, the researchers found that those people they examined who had a diet higher in linoleic acid were nearly two and a half times more likely to develop ulcerative colitis than those who ate the least of it.
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