Diets in Review - Find the Right Diet for You

thanksgiving



Learn to Separate Thanksgiving the Meal From Thanksgiving the Holiday

Robby is a 30-year-old weight-loss/health-gain/rad-maintain fanatic in Washington, DC. You can find her at fatgirlvsworld.blogspot.com and @fatgirlvsworld on Twitter. In the “real world” you can find her being tortured by an elliptical or throwing punches in a boxing ring. She has two cats who use her as a trampoline in the middle of the night. She loves wine, hates umbrellas, and has never seen an episode of True Blood. She may or may not be a ninja.

I don’t even want to imagine how ludicrous it might have looked: everyone sitting around the Thanksgiving table trying not to say the wrong thing in front of my boyfriend or stare at him too long. Sure he was a little big, and a bit different than the rest of us, but he and I had been together for so many years and I had grown to love, cherish, and rely on him. But I can see things from my family’s perspective as well. Why did Robby bring her refrigerator to Thanksgiving?

Yep. I just said that. For years I had been in an exclusive, dependent, and toxic relationship with my refrigerator. I would come home from work and go straight to him. If work was bad, I’d find something inside that would comfort me. If work was good, I’d find something inside to celebrate. If work was neither bad nor good, I would still check in to see what was happening. Same thing when I was bored, excited, tired, stressed or even without any discernible emotion.


Read Full Post >



Canola Oil Moderately Improves Nutrition of a Deep Fried Turkey

Turkey Frying in a pot with thermometer Here at DietsInReview, we believe in thoroughly enjoying holiday meals. Many diet plans encourage having a splurge meal once every week, and Thanksgiving is the perfect moment to enjoy rich foods without counting calories. In general, this prevents people who want to lose weight from feeling deprived and helps them avoid ditching a healthy eating plan for the entire holiday season.

However, certain foods seem over-the-top, even for a day of indulgence, and the deep fried turkey is one of these. On one hand, without the skin, deep fried turkey is deceptively moist and doesn’t have a greasy taste. On the other hand, we know quite well how many calories frying anything will add. So, I consulted with Alison Lewis of Ingredients Inc.

“The amount of fat and calories for a deep fried turkey is higher than a regular turkey,” says Lewis. “Three and a half ounces of deep fried turkey has approximately 190 calories and 11 grams of fat. The same portion of a roasted turkey typically has 165 calories and 7 grams of fat.” Eating turkey without the skin will lower the calories even further. “If you eat your roasted turkey skinless, calories drop to only 150 calories and 3.5 grams of fat,” adds Lewis.


Read Full Post >



Healthy Thanksgiving Recipes to Satisfy Diabetic Dieters

On Thanksgiving, some of us abandon our healthy diets for the day and give ourselves a free pass to indulge. Unfortunately, for the 25.8 million people in the United States with diabetes, a second helping of pie isn’t always an option. 

While Type 1 diabetes refers to insulin-dependent diabetes where the body does not produce insulin, the most common form of diabetes is Type 2, in which the body fails to use the insulin it produces. While some people manage their diabetes with medication or insulin injections, others can manage their diabetes with diet and exercise.

When you’re diabetic, whether you are trying to lose weight or manage the symptoms of your disease, you can still indulge on Thanksgiving with a few modifications.

At most Thanksgiving dinners, the turkey is the centerpiece of the meal and naturally high in protein and low in carbohydrates and sugar. If you’re cooking for a diabetic guest at your table this year, swap some of your favorite high-carb, sugar-laden appetizers, side dishes and desserts for healthier versions and see if anyone notices the difference.


Read Full Post >



Holidays Actually Create More Time to Workout

By Melisa Wells from Suburban Scrawl

I’ve been a group fitness instructor for nearly eight years now, and until recently it’s never been difficult for me to “find the time” to exercise. I get paid to teach classes on a schedule and although every class I teach doesn’t provide the best workout for me personally, it’s still scheduled time for me to move. A couple of years ago, I was up to teaching nine classes each week and I felt really great. Gradually though, due to the economy and changes in club scheduling, I started losing classes and now teach only one—a cycling class—each week.

Suddenly it became necessary for me to “find the time” to exercise. I have been taking Zumba classes and recently restarted Jillian Michaels30 Day Shred at home. I’m starting to feel good again, but Thanksgiving looms.

I have nothing against the holiday, really. Thanksgiving is full of family togetherness. Unfortunately, it’s also full of food, which seems to go without saying, but when you’re the type of person who is trying to get back into fighting shape, the thought of a food-focused holiday is a little stressful.

It’s okay though: I have a plan.


Read Full Post >



Get the Most of Thanksgiving with Leftover Turkey Recipes

Thanksgiving is hands down my favorite holiday of the year. I mean, as a food person, how can I not love Thanksgiving, as the holiday’s primary focus is a huge meal chock full of tasty dishes.

When I say a huge meal, I mean huge. Even if the dinner itself turns out to be small, my family gobbles up all of those pre-Thanksgiving grocery store sales and cooks up mountains of turkey, stuffing, sweet potatoes and Brussels sprouts. However, cooking up so much food for Thanksgiving inevitably leaves us with lots of leftovers.

While reheated turkey leftovers are great, sometimes you need to be a little creative in order to use up all of those turkey leftovers. Here are my top 6 ideas for cooking with leftovers.

Soup

This is definitely a classic in my house, as nothing beats a good bowl of soup on a cold day. Simply dice up some leftover roast turkey and add it in instead of chicken in your favorite soups. Here are two great leftover turkey recipes for soup: