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sunscreen



Four Ways to Stay Cool During Record-Breaking Heat

With this week’s record breaking heat, which has been blamed for five deaths in Tennessee, Maryland and Wisconsin, some experts predict an unusually hot summer for the United States.

According to MSNBC.com,  a new study from Stanford University predicts that global climate change will lead permanently to unusually hot summers by the middle of the century. So, as the summers heat up, what can you do to stay cool and keep hydrated?

Lather Up: With excessive heat often comes excessive sunshine and no matter how much time you plan to spend outside, sun safety is critical for preventing skin cancer. Use sunscreen with an SPF30 or higher daily for protection and if you’re planning on spending the day outdoors, up the ante to an SPF45 or higher.


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Healthy Easter Basket Stuffers for All Ages

By Jessie Gorges and Kelsey Murray

Forget the Peeps and chocolate bunnies; get your children, significant other and family members something healthy this year for Easter.

According to Dr. Kavey on WebMD.com, too much sugar can be a problem for children because it can lead children into lifelong obesity. “The reason that we think of it as a problem is because of the big rise in obesity in childhood, and that rise has occurred over the same time period that there’s been a major increase in the amount of simple sugar that children consume.”

Check out these healthy Easter basket treats with little to no sugar that everyone is sure to love.


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Sun Safety is Key to Meeting Vitamin D Recommendations

Vitamin D, a fat-soluble vitamin known as “the sunshine vitamin,” helps the body absorb calcium and prevents a number of diseases, particularly those relating to bone health. While the amount of vitamin D recommended in your diet will vary from person to person, it is widely regarded as an important part of nutrition and wellness.

While vitamin D is naturally present in only a select few foods, most people know that our bodies can absorb vitamin through exposure to sunshine.  As we head into the summer months, most skin health experts caution sunbathers everywhere against relying on the sun alone for their daily dose of vitamin D, as excessive amounts of sun can cause potentially fatal types of skin cancer.

Dr. Brooke Jackson, a board certified dermatologist and founder of the Skin Wellness Center of Chicago tells her patients to practice smart sun habits all year round, but especially as the weather heats up.


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Spring Break Skin Care Tips for Sun Protection

Out of all the things preoccupying your mind as you prepare for Spring Break, I doubt that skin cancer and premature aging receive the priority that they need. It’s easy to ignore the dangers of poor skincare during life’s care free, unadulterated moments but I assure you that the consequences could be dire. Preventing skin disorders and diseases is easier than you think, it just takes a little bit of careful planning.

UV rays cause the most damage during midday. Avoid the sun between the hours of 10:00 and 4:00. If you can’t resist the beach (and really, who can?) then make sure you take appropriate measures to protect your skin.


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Sunburn Protection From an Unlikely Source

Broccoli has many health benefits. Protecting you from the sun may be the last thing that comes to mind. But researchers in the U.S. are finding an extract from newly sprouted broccoli helps fend off damage from harmful ultraviolet radiation.

So, eating and wearing broccoli are beneficial.

The extract, known as sulforaphane, reduced skin redness and damage by more than one-third compared with untreated skin, they said.

“This is a first demonstration that a human tissue can be protected directly against a known human carcinogen,” said Dr. Paul Talalay of Johns Hopkins University, whose study appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

“This is not a sunscreen,” Talalay said. The extract helped fortify skin cells to fight the effects of UV radiation as opposed to blocking the rays.

At the highest doses, the extract reduced redness and swelling by an average of 37 percent. The effect varied considerably with volunteers, ranging from 8 to 78 percent protection, due to genetic differences.

Skin cancer – the most common cancer in the U.S. – affecting more than 1 million Americans every year, according to the National Cancer Institute. It kills more than 10,000 people each year, which is about four percent of all cancer deaths.