Diets in Review - Find the Right Diet for You

strength training



5 Strength Training Exercises for Runners

Cross training is included on many running training plans, but many beginning runners don’t know what it means or what they should do on those days.

Cross training day is the time to do something other than your sport to help prevent injury from repetitive stress and work on activities that help you do what you do better. For runners, strength training is a must. Strong and healthy muscles support the joints, give you more power, and help increase endurance. To make your next 5K a little faster or improve muscle endurance for your first half marathon, try these five strength training moves on your cross training days.

lateral lunge

  • Calf raises: I love to do calf raises off a step or stair to increase the range of motion. Raise up on toes then lower down past the edge of the step or stair. Raise back to start and repeat. Do this move slowly, counting 1, 2 down and 3, 4 up.
    Read Full Post >


7-Minute Workouts: High Intensity Interval Training Now Backed by Science

  • Exercise scientists have found that a seven minute, high intensity workout yields the same cardiovascular and muscular results as an extended fitness session, like running for a couple of hours.
  • The exercise program incorporates 12 different workouts, executed in quick succession with less than 30 seconds of rest between bouts, and works to maximize metabolic efficiency.
  • Longer exercise sessions negatively impacted the intensity of a workout, and 15-20 repetitions of an individual fitness bout fulfilled metabolic requirements, according to researchers at the Human Performance Center in Orlando, Florida.
  • The 12-step circuit aims to sustain an increased heart rate while burning calories and developing strength in the core, upper, and lower body.
  • The workout can be conveniently completed at home with your own body weight serving as natural dumbbells and your office chair the only equipment required.

Get More Information at: ACSM Health & Fitness Journal, ABC News, Greatist

Infographic
Read Full Post >



4 out of 5 Americans Aren’t Getting Enough Exercise

exercise

  • A new report report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention indicates that roughly 20 percent of U.S. adults are getting the recommended amount of exercise.
  • According to MedicalNewsToday.com, most Americans are falling short in the area of strength training. Research revealed only one in five U.S. adults is meeting the requirements for both aerobic and muscle-strengthening components of the physical activity guideline issued by the federal government.
  • Research was based on a phone survey of adults aged 18 and older issued by state health departments.
    Read Full Post >


Joni Henderson Lost 120 Pounds and Became a Piloxing Instructor

Years of putting her health on the back burner led Joni Henderson of Westerville, Ohio to weigh nearly 300 pounds. Despite being a skinny child and even bearing the nickname “Bony Joni” in college, a lifelong struggle with eating coupled with the hectic schedule of raising four kids ultimately left her overweight and not in control of her health.

“I ate whatever I wanted, and raising a family left me little time to be active,” she said. “I continued to put on weight as I buried myself in volunteering for my kids’ schools and activities. We were so busy. I would drop one child off, drive thru a fast food drive thru for food and on we went. I never took time for myself.”

Two things caused Joni to change: Going up from a 22 to a 24 dress size, and having to buy a 3XL instead of a 2XL. “I was 47, three years from 50, and I decided I didn’t want to be obese at 50 for fear of health problems,” she said. “I was the one who sat on the couch watching Biggest Loser with nachos or a bowl of ice cream in my lap.”
Read Full Post >



To Lose Weight, You Have to Build More Muscle

We all have that friend. The skinny one who eats whatever they want and never exercises. We all secretly dislike them for this trait and at the same time, wish we could be like them. New research is showing that they might be in a bad position, even worse than an overweight person who hits the gym. As scientist Bente Pedersen said this week, “It’s much better to be fit and fat, than skinny and lazy.”

Pedersen contributed along with many other professionals in Bill Gifford’s article for Outside this week. The article focused on more truths that have been revealed about fat. The report was lengthy but it highlighted some important misnomers about fat. Most know that we have “good” fat and “bad” fat, or subcutaneous fat and visceral fat. The good fat is more or less padding, while bad fat builds up in our mid-sections and can infiltrate our organs. A picture of fat invading muscles like the marbling of beef was used to describe how visceral fat can affect the inactive, not just the obese.

This bleak outlook of how fat can literally take over was explained further by Gerald Shulman, M.D., a diabetes researcher at Yale who contributed to the Outside article. Shulman explained how the amount of fat one has isn’t the problem, more so, it’s how the fat is distributed. He explained how fat build up in areas like the muscle and liver, or places it simply should not be, is when ailments like type 2 diabetes arise.
Read Full Post >