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Winning! Or Losing? America is Still the Fattest Nation with UK a Close Second

Earlier in the month, the Huffington Post reported that more than sixty percent of adults in England are overweight or obese. We’ve written about this before, but the trend seems to be growing—along with people’s pant sizes. Apparently Jamie Olivers healthy food habits haven’t caught on in his homeland. (Maybe it’s time he turn his focus back to the U.K. after working on our American health habits!) 

UK obesity

But wait. The United States hasn’t exactly gotten on board with healthy eating either: the nation had the highest obesity rate of all countriesas of March 2013: a reported 2/3 of all adults (people over 20 years of age) are overweight and an approximate 1/3 of Americans are obese. Right below the United States is Mexico, who has an obesity rate of about 25%.


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America’s Health Problems by State

Jeff Wyaski of Pleated Jeans created this map of the United States using information from the census and AmercasHealthRankings.org to illustrate what each state is infamous for in a funny, colorful manner. Here are some of the health-related statistics Wyaski chose to highlight:

Alabama’s Shame: Stroke
Oklahoma and Alabama are tied for the highest rates of stroke at 3.8 percent.

Arizona’s Shame: Highest Rate of Alcoholism

Connecticut’s Shame: Breast Cancer
On Average, 134.1 out 100,000 have breast cancer in Connecticut, according to StateHealthFacts.org.

Georgia’s Shame: Most Sickly
Based on the highest rate of influenza.

Kansas’ Shame: Poorest Health
Based on the highest number of sick days taken per month, at 3.5 per days.

Kentucky’s Shame: Most Cancer Deaths
It’s not surprising to find out that Kentucky also has the highest rate of tobacco smokers, at 25.6 percent of the population.


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Are We Finally Getting the Message?

Is it possible that there’s good news on the obesity epidemic in the U.S.? New stats show a leveling off of the number of people considered obese.

About 33 percent of male adults and 35 percent of women in the U.S. were obese in 2005-2006, according to the federal government. Those numbers are slightly higher than the previously surveyed, but considered statistically insignificant. The optimist in me says people are starting to get it. The cynic in me says that it’s just a pause since we’ve had such a large jump throughout the years. Here’s more on the news.