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Sugary Drinks Linked to Higher Blood Pressure

If you’re someone who indulges in the regular, or even occasional, soda or sugary fruit drink you’ll want to read this. While soda has already been linked to bone loss and is incredibly high in sugar, new research suggests that sugary drinks may also be associated with higher blood pressure levels in adults.

According to research in Hypertension: Journal of the American Heart Association, scientists found that for every extra sugar-sweetened beverage consumed in a day,  study participants on average had significantly higher systolic blood pressure by 1.6 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) and diastolic blood pressure by 0.8 mm Hg. This rise in blood pressure remained statistically significant even after adjusting for differences in body mass, researchers said. They also found that those drinking more than one serving per day consumed more calories than those who didn’t — an average of more than 397 calories per day.


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Group Calls for FDA Ban on Soda Caramel

It’s not been a very good week for the soda industry. First, we told you about the potential link between diet soda and heart and stroke risks, now a consumer advocacy group is urging the Food and Drug Administration to ban some chemically-enhanced caramel food colorings used in soda, as they say it can cause cancer.

While the group still thinks that the threat of obesity related to drinking soda is a bigger health threat, they are petitioning the FDA to ban the caramels in question. While pure caramel is made from melted sugar, but two types used in food coloring have ammonia in them which produce compounds shown to cause various cancers in animal studies done by the National Institutes of Health.
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The Connection Between Soda and Bone Loss

Attention all Diet Coke and Diet Dr. Pepper lovers: Soda has been linked to osteoporosis, a condition that is marked by bone loss and puts you at risk for fractures, splints and breaks.

We all know by now that the sugar in soda is linked to a host of health conditions, from obesity to dental cavities. Now soda is earning demerits for its association with degrading the skeletal system.

The problem though is not with all sodas, but with the colas. So drinks like Sprite, 7-Up and Mountain Dew don’t appear to have the same bone-weakening effect as dark sodas do.

Researchers at Tufts University found that women who regularly drank cola-based sodas (three or more a day) had almost four percent lower bone mineral density in the hip, even when calcium and vitamin D intake were accounted for.

So what exactly is in dark sodas that is putting your bones at risk?


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Dr. Pepper Removes High Fructose Corn Syrup Temporarily

Celebrating 125 years of being one of the most unique and popular sodas around, Dr. Pepper is getting rid of its high fructose corn syrup. For now. It’s a temporary move to swap out the ingredient for real sugar, the ingredient formerly used by most soda manufacturers. The nostalgic-tasting soda will be available beginning July 4th weekend through September.

This move comes on the heels of other soda manufacturers doing retro versions of their beverages, like Pepsi Throwback.

What are the health implications? The real sugar is more ideal, as the sugar cane is broken down into what is basically pure sugar. Whereas the high fructose corn syrup that is traditionally used is becoming a health concern for its link as a culprit in the obesity epidemic. The beloved ingredient of the processed food industry is used because the processed sweetener is cheap to produce and extends the shelf life of the foods it is in.
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5 Reasons to Can Soda

Soda is the single biggest contributor to an unhealthy diet, and it is one of the highest calorie sources in the world, accounting for somewhere between 11 and 19 percent of all the calories consumed worldwide.

It’s cheap, addictive, and readily available; found at virtually every picnic, shopping mall, and sporting event you might attend. Often advertised as containing extra vitamins and billed as a “healthy choice,” it can be difficult to quit a soda habit. Especially as the weather warms up, and people are out and about, soda is almost always present.

Here are five reasons that you should rethink your beverage choice.


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