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Guiltlessly Indulge in Your Senses

Our bodies respond to sensory input and enable us to experience enticing, sensual pleasure that can sometimes be hard to resist. If this brings up an image from a page in the Kama Sutra, fear not. Enjoying your senses is neither just about sex, nor does it require a lover.

The following are a few examples of how you can indulge in your senses so you may experience gratifying and unbelievable pleasure without feeling guilty. Because we all interpret our senses differently, experiences may vary from person to person.

Sense of Sound

One single sound can affect our mood and create a visceral reaction that reverberates through our bodies. For those who are hearing impaired, it is possible to feel sound. Sensing the vibration of your own heartbeat or feeling the rumbling tremors of a thunderstorm are ways you can enjoy the tingling pleasures of sound within your body.


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Drink More Water through Sensory Adaptation

drinking waterToday while reviewing the kaizen theory of making small changes with a client, in this case to reduce the amount of sugar she puts in her coffee, she stated that the first cup of the morning is always the most difficult. She reported that if she is able to drink the first cup with less sugar, the rest of the coffee that she has that day goes down much more easily. This makes sense because coffee is one of those things that is an “acquired taste;” however, she said the same thing was true for drinking water. If she worked out earlier in the day, she would drink water throughout the day, put down the coffee, and not pick up any more calorie-laden beverages.
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Smell: The Hidden Link to Weight Loss

sensaOf the five senses, the one that you’d think directly affects how much you weigh is taste, with smell in a close second. But according to the makers of Sensa, smell is even more important than you think. Sensa is a seasoning weight-loss product that not only makes your food tastier, but gives it a scent that is appealing and makes you less hungry.

Sensa’s makers say that their product stimulates the olfactory bulb, which is the organ that transmits smell from the nose to the brain to signal that you are full.

“Eighty percent of what you perceive as taste is actually smell,” said Christopher Adams, a molecular biologist and the founder of Compellis Pharmaceuticals.
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