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7 Healthy Eating Tips from the R.D. Behind “The Pescetarian Plan” (It’s Not Just About Fish!)

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By Shae Blevins, contributor for DietsInReview.com

The diet and nutrition in The Pescetarian Plan is built on The Seven Pescetarian Principles the author, Janis Jibrin, RD, created.

Principle #1: Do not eat meat and poultry; eat recommended amounts of protein.

Proteins allowed with The Pescetarian Plan include fish and seafood, of course, as well as cheese, eggs, edamame and tofu, among other plant-based proteins found in grains, legumes and nuts.

Principle #2: Eat fruits and vegetables!

Fruits and vegetables of the traditional American diet might be apples and potatoes, but The Pescetarian Plan encourages you to explore the produce section at your local grocer to find kiwi, mangoes and figs. The fruits and vegetables allowed in The Pescetarian Plan are not always Mediterranean-based, such as sweet potatoes, but always provide the nutrition the author promised.

Principle #3: Keep treats and alcohol at a minimum.

The Pescetarian Plan allows for you to indulge in your favorite treats, such as salty chips and sweet cookies, but it recommends eating those treats in moderation. The same goes for consuming alcohol – and it should be wine.

Principle #4: Get a handle on starches.

The Pescetarian Plan recommends that half your grain servings should be whole grains, since people who eat whole grains tend to be at a healthier weight. Other starches, such as legumes, should be eaten at least four times a week.

Principles #5: Switch to low-fat or non-fat dairy.

Switching from whole fat milk to low-fat milk will save calories and saturated fat allowances in The Pescetarian Plan. Dairy is also one of the food groups you are allowed to cut completely if you have allergies or don’t like it.

Principle #6: Enjoy healthy fats!

The Pescetarian Plan is not a low-fat diet. Approximately 35 percent of the calories in this plan come from fat – the healthy fats founds in nuts, seeds, olive oil and avocados.

Principle #7: Drink more water!

Water is the beverage of choice for The Pescetarian Plan, and Jibrin recommends drinking six cups of water a day or enough so that your urine looks like lemonade. Fruit juices, sodas and sweet teas are, in Jibrin’s opinion, a waste of calories.

The Pescetarian Plan provides calories plans instead of meal plans, which allow you to be more creative with what you eat when but do not give you strict guidelines on what you should eat for breakfast, lunch and dinner. The calories plans outline how many servings of each pescetarian food group you should eat at different calories levels, such as 1,500 calories a day or 2,500 calories a day. However, the diet does show you how to plan your own meals through templates.

 

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The Approved Fish and Seafood List for Pregnant Women

There seem to be so many rules when it comes to diet during pregnancy. There are are many “don’ts” as well as “you musts” when it comes to foods that promote the baby’s and mother’s health. One of the trickiest areas for pregnant moms is the issue of fish consumption. On one hand, moms are told to get a healthy dose of fish for the omega-3s and other nutrients. Yet, on the other hand, moms are told to watch out for too much fish as the mercury levels could be dangerous to the baby. So, what’s a mom to do? Thankfully, there are some answers.

According to the Mayo Clinic, fish and seafood are touted as a great source of protein, iron, and omega-3s. All of these nutrients are important in development of the baby, specifically brain development. However, regular consumption of fish high in mercury can lead to a build up in the bloodstream which can eventually damage a growing baby’s brain and nervous system.

To handle this conundrum the FDA released guidelines for pregnant mothers regarding the mercury levels in fish. The guidelines state that no more than 12 oz. of low mercury fish should be consumed on a weekly basis. Fish in the “highest” mercury level category should be avoided completely and those that fall in the “high” category should be kept to three 6-oz servings per month.
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Your Red Snapper May Actually be a Mercury-Filled Tilefish

The nonprofit ocean protection group called Oceana has been performing a study, the results of which were released last week. The question – whether or not we’re being sold, and therefore eating, the fish we think we are.

Oceana took a sum of around 1,215 fish from 12 different parts of the country and examined them to see if they matched their labels or not. Listed below are the study’s findings.

  • About one-third of the 1,215 fish samples bought from 2010-2012 were mislabeled.
  • In a collection of 120 samples that were marked as red snapper fish, 28 different species of fish were discovered. Of those, 17 were not even within the snapper fish family.
  • Southern California was the region most likely to be misinformed with 52 percent of the samples bought there actually being something different.
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How to Grill Simple Summer Seafood

With a summer heat wave affecting most of the country, home cooks are more enthusiastic than ever about recipes that don’t involve turning on the oven or stove. If you’re already tiring of salads, sandwiches and simple grilled chicken, it’s time to look to the sea for some grilling inspiration.

Lauren Salkeld , Senior Editor, Epicurious, likes to keep things simple when she’s preparing or cooking seafood on the grill.

Use healthy oils. Sometimes people perceive fish to be difficult to grill because it falls apart during the cooking process. “Fish often falls apart because it sticks to the grill,” said Salkeld. “Be sure to gently rub or brush fish with oil and you shouldn’t have too much trouble.” To keep your favorite fish figure-friendly, opt for a heart-healthy oil, like canola or olive.


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5 Balanced Dinner Menus to Fill Your MyPlate Icon

With the recent announcement that the food pyramid will be replaced by the new MyPlate icon, Americans are more aware than ever that it’s time to start eating their vegetables.

While the plate icon offers a visual, user-friendly guide to help people make better food choices, some of the 2010 Dietary Guidelines, like eating more fish, beans and whole grains, are not addressed.

Before you start cooking dinners based on MyPlate, keep the size of your plate in mind and check your portion sizes. According to the Mayo Clinic, reasonable portion sizes include:

  • One serving of protein should be three to six ounces (three for women, six for men) and about the size of a deck of playing cards.
  • One serving of whole grains should be the equivalent of one slice of bread, 1/3 cup brown rice or 1/2 cup whole-wheat pasta.
  • One serving of dairy is equivalent to an 8 ounce glass of milk or 1 ounce cheese (about the size of four dice).
  • One serving of fruit and vegetables should be approximately 1/2 cup cooked or 1 cup raw.


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