Diets in Review - Find the Right Diet for You

saturated fats



High-Fat Diets Actually Help the Heart, Study Finds

File this one in the “goes against everything we’ve been told” file.

A recent study published in American Journal of Physiology-Heart and Circulatory Physiology suggests that a high-fat diet is OK and even beneficial for the heart. The study, which looked at cardiac function in patients suffering from heart failure, found that that a high-fat diet improved the heart’s ability to pump, along with boosting cardiac insulin resistance (which reduces the risk of diabetes). Sounds pretty different than what we’ve been told all along right? That eating too much fat is bad for the heart?

Not so fast. According to the study which was  funded by the National Institutes of Health, the American Heart Association, and the Case Center for Imaging Research, all fats are not created equal. In fact, a balanced diet that includes mono- and polyunsaturated fats, and which replaces simple sugars and highly processed foods with complex carbs, are most beneficial for damaged hearts. Notice what wasn’t on that list of a healthy diet? Trans fats or saturated fats.


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Top 10 Worst Foods for Your Workout

Below is a list of the top ten foods that you shouldn’t eat, especially if you exercise consistently every day.

Each food below is known to hinder the results of exercise. Most of the foods below will make you feel sluggish, fat, and will reduce your overall energy levels throughout the course of your exercise routines. Food for thought!


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Your Guide to Good and Bad Fats

The American vocabulary uses “fat” as a negative adjective when actually, some fat is beneficial to your health. When it comes to diet, certain types of dietary fat an aid weight loss and help improve bodily functions.

The Harvard School of Public Health says to avoid trans-fats, limit saturated fats and choose healthy fats. What are healthy fats, you may ask? The “good fats” include monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, which have been said to help lower disease risk.


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8 New Food Rules From 13 Scientists

Michael Pollan had his 64 rules for eating healthy and in recent weeks, 13 scientists who were appointed to an advisory committee released their new “food rules”. This early release of “rules” is not yet the final dietary guidelines for Americans, so now is our chance to have some influence by providing our feedback. Final dietary guidelines will become available at the end of 2010, so make sure to give your 2 cents in our comments section and we will work to roll these up and help steer our country to a healthier place.

1. Eat fewer calories. The average person needs to consume roughly 2,000 calories per day. Most don’t know what they should consume for their individual height and weight, let alone how much they are actually eating. To find out what your daily calorie consumption should be, visit: DIR Health Calculator.
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Vegetarian Diet Myths Debunked

Vegetarianism isn’t just about eating ‘bunny food’ and pounds of tofu everyday. There are a lot of myths surrounding vegetarianism; everything from how healthy going vegetarian really is for the human body all the way down to how to make proper meatless nutrient substitutions. We have compiled a list of the most prevalent vegetarian myths out there and are here to set the record straight.

MYTH: Vegetarians don’t get enough protein.

FACT: Protein doesn’t only come from animal sources. Protein can be found in veg-head-friendly foods like beans, whole grains, and vegetables. Some great sources of protein for vegetarians are tempeh, quinoa, almonds, brown rice, and pinto beans. In addition, most people, vegetarian or not, get more protein than they need in a day, so extra effort to add protein to your diet is usually unnecessary.
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