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salmonella



Nesquik Recalled for Possible Salmonella Contamination

Nestle is issuing a voluntary recall on more than 200,000 packages of its popular chocolate drink mix Nesquik. The product is believed to be contaminated with salmonella.

The Associated Press reported that the issue involves the ingredient calcium carbonate. Nestle stated that their ingredient supplier, Omya Inc., was the source of the possible contamination. The recall only affects the dry powder, not the ready made drinks.

The containers that have been affected are the 10.9, 21.8, and 40.7 ounce canisters. They all have the “best if sold by” date of October 2014. Consumers are urged to cease use and can return the item to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers may also contact Nestle Consumer Services.

There have been no reports of illness at this time. Salmonella poisoning symptoms can include diarrhea, abdominal cramping, and fevers. The elderly, infants, and pregnant women are at higher risk of severe symptoms.

Calcium carbonate, the ingredient that caused the recall, is added to many foods as either a preservative or a source of added calcium. According to their website, Nesquik states that it is fortified with added calcium to help build strong bones. Apparently this is why the ingredient is included in this product.
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Organic Baby Spinach Recalled in Nearly 20 States

A heads up to spinach lovers: there’s been a recall on two brands of organic baby spinach distributed in the U.S.

According to a recall alert published by the FDA, the decision to pull the suspect spinach from shelves was made after a random test at a distribution center in Terrel, Texas, found a possible salmonella contamination in a finished package of spinach.

The test was completed by the Texas Department of Agriculture under a cooperative agreement the USDA holds with individual states requiring them to hold frequent, random testing of fruits and vegetables for safety precautions.

The contaminated bag of spinach came from Taylor Farms in Salinas, California, where the grower took impressive cautionary measures to remove packages of spinach being sold under the brand names Private Selection and Marketside. No illnesses have been reported to date as a result of the potential contamination.
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Smucker’s Peanut Butter Recall Due to Salmonella Risk

With a name like Smucker’s it has to be… recalled. Some of the company’s 16-ounce jars of Smucker’s Natural Peanut Butter Chunky is being pulled from shelves due to possible salmonella contamination. The recall is only their chunky-style peanut butter.

During a routine sampling program it was revealed that some of the peanut butter could contain the bacteria. Luckily, there have been no reported illnesses associated with the recall.

The potentially dangerous jars can be narrowed down to certain regions of the country during a particular time range:
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Bagged Salad Recall Due to Salmonella Contamination

By Kelsey Murray

If you like the ease and convenience of bagged salads, you might want to think twice before reaching for a bag in your local grocery store. Apparently, a producer of bagged salads recently realized that their products may be contaminated with salmonella and has now issued a recall to remove the contaminated products from store shelves.

Taylor Farms Retail of California recalled 3,265 cases of bagged salads. The recall was prompted by a random test of a bag of spinach that was prepared by the company. Taylor Farms Retail voluntarily recalled the bagged salads, which were distributed in 15 states, including Arizona, Colorado, Florida, New York, Texas, and Washington.

The contaminated salads include several blends that were released by the Fresh Selection, H-E-B, Marketside, and Taylor Farm brand names. These products have expiration dates between October 18 and 21.


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Del Monte Files a Lawsuit Against the FDA for Cantaloupe Recall

We should be able to trust the Food and Drug Administration to protect us against foods that might not be safe for our consumption, right? I never would have questioned this before, but after Del Monte Fresh Produce recently filed a lawsuit that could have long-term consequences against the regulatory organization, I am starting to have my doubts.

Let me explain: The FDA recently forced Del Monte to halt the importation of its Guatemalan cantaloupes because there was a possibility that the fruits could have been contaminated with salmonella. Then, Del Monte fired back against the FDA with a lawsuit. This all seems like standard operations, but the problem is that in the future, it is possible that the FDA will become more reluctant to issue warnings against possibly-contaminated foods for fear of being taken to court.


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