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The Brown Fat Takeaway TIME Magazine Missed

scientist

Full confession: I love to read about brown fat, a relatively newly discovered form of fat that burns calories directly. Brown fat might be the key to weight loss, writes Alice Park, who covers breaking health news for TIME magazine. Last week, she published, Why Brown Fat May Be the Key to Weight Loss. Kudos to TIME for covering valuable research (when others did not.) But there’s a lot more to add. First, some words about brown fat.

The body makes two kinds of fat: white fat, familiar to all, the storage form of energy, and brown fat that is not stored but burned directly as fuel. When triggered by exposure to the cold, brown fat generates heat (white fat just sits there). Hibernating animals produce brown fat to stay warm during the winter. Newborn babies have lots of brown fat, their own little furnaces, to protect against the cold. We used to think that adults could not make brown fat, but now we know everyone can turn white fat into brown when there is need.
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Your Sports Bra is the Most Important Item in Your Gym Bag

enell

We’ve all got our reasons for not being as physically active as we should. Typically, low energy level, time, and other lifestyle constraints affect our decision to hit the gym. But according to a study from the Journal of Physical Activity and Health, there’s another reason women aren’t engaging in exercise as much as they’d like.

Seventeen percent of women reported that the breast was a barrier to physical activity participation. I can’t find the right sports bra and I am embarrassed by excessive breast movement were the most significant breast-related setbacks recorded by the study.

It’s no wonder women experience this obstacle when considering the unique nature of female breast tissue. According to this article from the New York Times, a recent study by the Research Group in Breast Health discovered that “unsupported female breasts — that is, those not contained within a bra — oscillate as much as eight inches in space when a woman runs, and not just up and down, but also side to side, forward and backward.” Wow. That’s a lot of motion!

This is no surprise to Renelle Braaten, founder and president of ENELL, a company whose purpose is to create state-of-the-art, high-quality performance sports bras for women C cup or above so that they have the opportunity to fully participate in an active lifestyle.
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Exercise is Driving Us to Drink! Do You Imbibe after a Workout?

drinking

We know exercise can make you thirsty, but a new study is suggesting physical activity is making people reach for something quite a bit stronger than water.

In the study, published in Health Psychology, researchers asked participants to track their alcohol consumption and when they exercised over three stretches of 21 days. Strangely, the records showed that people tended to drink more on the days they exercised more.

Participants in the study reported more physical activity from Thursday to Sunday, meaning they exercised more on the weekends. They also drank more too, but it’s already known that people drink more on weekends than they do during the week. It would have been case closed for the study had the researchers not put a control in place to account for increased drinking on the weekends.

“We adjusted for the day of week, so any associations between physical activity and alcohol consumption could not be attributed to the fact that it was, for example, a Saturday,” said lead study author David E. Conroy in a statement.
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Retrain Your Brain to Actually Enjoy Eating Healthy Food

diet

We all know eating salad is better than eating candy bars, but you can’t control which foods you actually enjoy eating…or can you? This new study brings new meaning to brain food.

Shape Magazine recapped a recent study published by Nutrition & Diabetes explaining that it may be possible to neurologically reprogram your brain to prefer healthier foods. The study took 13 people and gave the first group a structured high protein, low glycemic index, low calorie diet while the second group could continue eating “normal” foods like pizza and potato chips. They took MRI scans of all participants before the study, then again six months later.

Both times, all participants were shown images of healthy foods and unhealthy foods, then they tracked and compared the neurological responses.

What did they find? 
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Battle of the Beverages: Tea is Better for Long-Term Health than Coffee

hot tea

It’s sure to start a battle of the beverages, but a new study is making the claim that tea may be better for your long-term health than coffee.

Presented in France, this study looked at the overall health of both tea and coffee drinkers for seven years. As Shape reveals, those who drank tea had a 24 percent lower non-cardiovascular mortality rate than coffee drinkers.

The presenter of the study, Nicolas Danchin, M.D., Ph.D., said in a release, “If you have to choose between tea or coffee it’s probably better to drink tea. Coffee and tea are important components of our way of life.”

That’s definitely true. Many people simply can’t start their day without a few sips of tea or coffee. Happily, this morning habit isn’t a bad one to develop at all. Both tea and coffee have been shown to have health benefits when consumed in reasonable amounts.

According to Professor Danchin, tea may even be a better choice than abstaining from either drink.
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