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pull-up



Pull-ups are Taken to a New Level on Scaffolding Bars in New York City

Many believe the pull-up to be a sign of true athletic ability. Adding pull-ups to your training regimen doesn’t involve any fancy equipment because they use your own body weight for resistance. Brothers Danny and Al Kavadlo take the traditional pull-up to a whole new level in this short video promoting non-gym exercise.

It’s clear that pull-ups work out the biceps and triceps, but did you know that they also condition the shoulder, back and abdominal muscles? Regular pull-ups (you know, the kind that don’t involve circus theatrics!) can be extremely difficult, but the physical benefits far outweigh the challenge. Benefits include:
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The Hard Road to the Unassisted Pull-Up

The road to performing an unassited pull-up is short for some, but long for many. A pull-up is one of the toughest exercises for the body, but one of the best indicators of strength and endurance.

There are four main pull-up grips: wide, narrow, reverse, and neutral grips and depending on which grip you use, the pull-up works almost every muscle in the upper body. The wide grip isolates the latissimus dorsi and I strongly believe it is the toughest way to do a pull-up. The narrow grip isolates the rhomboids and is one of the most popular forms most people use. The reverse grip is by far my favorite and targets the biceps more than anything and lastly, the neutral grip targets both the biceps and latissimus dorsi and is similar in function to doing a bicep hammer curl.
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