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psychological stress



Strength Training and Cardio Effective at Edging Out Stress

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By Janis Jibrin, M.S., R.D., Best Life lead nutritionist

If you’re like the majority of Americans—67 percent of them, to be exact—then you’re stressed out. And your stress may trigger physical symptoms, like fatigue or upset stomach, as it does in 72 percent of Americans, according to an American Psychological Association survey. These symptoms are bad enough, but stress can be even more destructive, causing chronic inflammation, depression, heart disease, and other conditions.

There are many ways to combat stress, including meditation, social support, building your confidence, and coping skills, but exercise is near the top of the list. Exercise primarily refers to aerobic exercise (cardio), but a few studies also indicate that strength training is a good stress-buster as well.

Getting sweaty is exceptionally effective because it attacks stress from so many angles. When you regularly work out, you’re:

  • Likely to have lower levels of substances that spike stress and depression, such as cortisol and other stress hormones, inflammatory compounds and free radicals.
  • Apt to have a tamer cardiovascular response to stress; your heart rate and blood pressure don’t rise as high, and come back down more quickly.
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Angry? Take Heart in This News

Home is where the heart is, but anger is where the heart attack lurks. A new report from the Medical University of South Carolina reveals that having anger issues may earn men with prehypertension a quick trip to heart disease. The same could also be true for women, but further studies are needed.

The data came from 2,334 American adults aged 48-67. They were followed for 4-8 years during the 1990s. Chronically angry men were moderately more likely to develop high blood pressure (hypertension) and heart disease than their calmer counterparts.

For men and women alike, long-term psychological stress was linked to heart disease. And the results didn’t change when the researchers factored in age, sex, race, smoking status, and LDL (“bad”) cholesterol.