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poverty



Girl Effect and Nike Take On Poverty, Disease, Malnutrition, and Education

While DietsInReview’s primary focus is weight loss, disease prevention and overall health and wellness, we are also concerned about the health impact of poverty and malnutrition. Obesity may be a major problem in the United States and most of the developed world, but many developing nations struggle with nutritional deficiencies as a result of an insufficient food supply and poverty. Nutrition, health and health care, social justice, disease, and so many other concerns are wrapped up with poverty. It can be an overwhelming and cyclical problem.

The Girl Effect aims to improve poverty, disease, war, social inequality, and the world’s economy by educating girls in the developing world. It may sound idealistic, but there is much research behind the hypothesis that when girls are given any additional education, they are less likely to marry early, have children early, die from childbirth, contract HIV, and live in poverty. The Girl Effect also recognizes the different impact that women have on children and families versus men. According to The Girl Effect Fact Sheet women reinvest 90 percent of their income into their families, while men only reinvest 30 to 40 percent. That means that educating a young girl and giving her the opportunity to earn an income is at least 50 percent more likely to reduce poverty in her family than if a young boy was given additional educational opportunities. Women can make powerful changes when given the opportunity.
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End Childhood Hunger with the Great American Dine Out

Most of us could benefit from eating out less, but if you are looking for a noble reason to hit up one of your favorite eateries, look no further than the Great American Dine Out.

From September 19 to September 25, Share Our Strength’s third annual Great American Dine Out is working with thousands of restaurants across the country. They will be offering great promotions, featuring special dishes, and donating part of their proceeds from that week to help support Share Our Strength’s work to end childhood hunger in this country. This year, Aaron McCargo Jr. from Food Network’s “Big Daddy’s House” is the Great American Dine Out’s official spokesperson and he is encouraging you take part of this special cause.

All you have to do is locate a participating restaurant via this Share Our Strength Restaurant Finder and dine in or dine out to help make the organization’s mission of “No Kid Hungry” a reality.
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Considering Haiti: Rethinking Eating Habits

haitian boyIt seems like Haiti is on everyone’s hearts and minds at the moment. Such events reach us at a level where we change behavior. I doubt that many of the people texting donations to the Red Cross had never sent a non-personal text message before; I wonder how many had never previously sent a text message. I know a six-year-old child who was doing extra chores to earn money to give to his school’s fundraiser. Big events impact our thinking and our priorities. In these cases, we are driven by compassion and concern. Sometimes it takes big events to break us out of focusing only on our own concerns and daily stressors.

Has Haiti been on your heart or mind? Have you done anything differently as a result? Has the Haitian earthquake changed your eating habits?
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Understanding Haiti’s Health Crisis

haitian childrenWhile DietsInReview.com’s primary focus is weight loss, disease prevention and overall health and wellness, we are switching our focal point to discuss the other end of the health spectrum – poverty and malnutrition - two hand-in-hand health issues that affect more than 80 percent of the citizens of Haiti, the small island that was wrecked by a massive earthquake this past Tuesday.

As tens of thousands are feared dead and international humanitarian efforts are underway, it is important to consider just how serious this disaster is for the nine million citizens of this impoverished country. And in order to do that, a glimpse into the health challenges that Haiti faces can provide a subtle background into just how dire the situation is and how serious it may become in the coming days, weeks and months.


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Blog Action Day 2008: Poor Women Most at Risk for Obesity

It’s no longer news that the United States is nearing an obesity epidemic. But did you know that women are at a much greater risk than men for becoming overweight? In fact, according to a recent study by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, women in the United States increased their caloric intake by 22% (and men by 7%) in the 30 years between 1971 and 2000.

Obesity Rates Versus Socioeconomic Status in Women

Obesity Rates Versus Socioeconomic Status in Women

Did you also know that women who have a lower socioeconomic status are 50 percent more likely to be obese than those women who belong to a higher income bracket? In many countries, especially developing countries, the trend is just opposite. Extra pounds are a sign of opulence, whereas thin figures are an indication of being poor. And this makes sense, right? If you don’t have money, you can’t put food on the table and your waistline inevitably shrinks.
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