Diets in Review - Find the Right Diet for You

Pepsi



Forget Drinkified: How PepsiCo Could Build a Better Snack

CEO of Pepsi Indra NooyiIn the May 16 edition of The New Yorker, John Seabrook delves into the ways that PepsiCo is working to reposition itself in light of the global obesity crisis. “Snacks for a Fat Planet” is bookended with the author’s interactions with Indra Nooyi, PepsiCo’s C.E.O. Nooyi argues that it’s not enough for the company to make snacks that taste good, but also be “the good company.”

Nooyi is clearly a leader who understands the huge potential for corporate good, both for the bottom line and for society. She also sees that the health crisis created by obesity does not bode well for the future of PepsiCo’s profits, no doubt a factor in the company’s efforts to make healthier products. Earlier this year, the company began making a number of Frito-Lay products with natural ingredients. They also have plans to reduce the amount of sodium and sugar in their products by 25 percent by the year 2015, under guidelines created by Derek Yach, the former World Health Organization cabinet director.


Read Full Post >



Food Packaging Shrinks While Prices Stay the Same

If you have been to the supermarket lately, you might have noticed that the prices of your favorite groceries have increased a little bit. The price of almost everything from fresh veggies to bread to milk is increasing. Hershey has even recently announced that they will be increasing the prices of all of their goods by 10 percent.

By increasing their prices, some companies worry that these straightforward price hikes will result in consumers buying less of each product or choosing cheaper alternatives, such as store-brand cereal instead of General Mills. The answer to this dilemma for the food companies? Decrease the amount of food in the packages but keep the prices the same- and, sadly for consumers, the food companies have no obligation to the consumers to tell them about this reduction.

So how much of a reduction are we talking about? The largest reduction from our list will go to Reese’s peanut butter cups, who will reduce their chocolate-peanut-butter goodness by 37 percent, or 0.1 ounces. Chicken of the Sea Tuna will be reduced by 1 ounce, or 17 percent of its total weight. Heinz Ketchup will also take four ounces of their standard bottles, reducing the bottles by 11 percent. However, it’s not only food products; non-food products are also taking a hit. Bounty paper towels will be reduced by 10 sheets, or 7.2 percent. Toilet paper and moist towelettes are also likely to be reduced in the near future, if not already.


Read Full Post >



Critics Say Pepsi’s ‘Skinny’ Diet Can Perpetuates Negative Body Image, Stereotypes

Diet Pepsi has introduced a new “skinny” can in accordance with New York Fashion Week. The diet soda can is a tall, sleek version of itself that PepsiCo said was “made in celebration of beautiful, confident women.” While the can might look appealing on store shelves, critics wonder if the new approach will perpetuate harmful stereotypes against women and body image.

PepsiCo, a Fashion Week sponsor, is hosting a series of events to launch the new can, including collaborations with popular designers such as Charlotte Ronson and Betsey Johnson.

“Our slim, attractive new can is the perfect complement to today’s most stylish looks, and we’re excited to throw its coming-out party during the biggest celebration of innovative design in the world,” Jill Beraud, chief marketing officer for PepsiCo said in a statement.


Read Full Post >



Diet Pepsi Can Gets a Makeover for Fashion Week

Diet Pepsi Thinner Can Diet Pepsi is promoting the idea of “slimness” associated with their product with a new packaging ploy. The tall, thin can was launched during New York City’s Fashion Week, no doubt intended to suggest the kind of body one might have by switching to diet soda. The company says the new look is made to celebrate confident, beautiful women.

“Our slim, attractive new can is the perfect complement to today’s most stylish looks, and we’re excited to throw its coming-out party during the biggest celebration of innovative design in the world,” Jill Beraud, chief marketing officer for PepsiCo, said in a statement. The stouter style of Pepsi can will continue to be available.


Read Full Post >



How Many Calories are in Your Favorite Super Bowl Ads

I wait all year long to watch the Super Bowl. Part of the allure is the game itself – I’m a huge football fan. The other big draw for me would be the commercials. I love to see how imaginative and creative the companies become, all in an effort to get your attention and your future purchases. Have you noticed, though, that the vast majority of the foods featured in the Super Bowl commercials aren’t healthy? Let’s take a look at some of them.

Doritos – One serving of Doritos is one ounce, between 12 and 14 chips. With 150 calories, 7 grams of fat and 18 grams of carbohydrates, these salty chips make it difficult to stop at one serving.

Coke/PepsiSoda is a dieter’s worst nightmare. It’s full of high fructose corn syrup and caffeine and the carbonation can cause stomach troubles. One 12 ounce can of Coke contains 143 calories, one can of Pepsi contains 150 calories and each has more than 40 grams of carbohydrates.


Read Full Post >