Diets in Review - Find the Right Diet for You

paleo diet



Day After Super Bowl Biggest Diet Decision Day for Men

Chips, football and Six Pack of Beer and TV

According to an online US survey, 1 in 4 football fans claim to have gained an average of 10 pounds during football season.

The survey, conducted on behalf of Nutrisystem by Harris Interactive, found that out of 1,283 American football fans polled in early January 2013, 25 percent reported that they gained weight during the football season. For those that reported weight gain, the average was 10 pounds, while 16 percent admitted they gained 20 pounds or more.

Here’s another shocker: According to the USDA, the Super Bowl is the second largest food consumption day behind Thanksgiving. Americans will eat 30 million pounds of snacks, with the average football fan consuming 1,200 calories and 50 grams of fat, reports The Calorie Control Council. And that’s just from snacking- it doesn’t even take into to account all the alcohol and calorie-laden beverages that are also consumed.

This weight gain can be made even worse if you’re a fan of the losing team. According to a recent study published in Psychological Science, fans of the losing team tend to load up on saturated fats and sugars the Monday after the big game, whereas fans of the winning team opt for healthier foods.


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Google World Diet Trends for 2015: Dukan and Atkins Compete for World’s Most Popular Diet

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Hands up if you vowed to lose a few pounds in 2015 by following a diet plan? You’re not alone.

If you want to find the latest and greatest in, well, anything, you probably head to Google and researching a diet plan that fits your lifestyle is no exception. From only eating food that a caveman would eat (Paleo diet), to half-hearted vegetarianism (flexitarianism), there were certainly a wide variety of diets to choose from in 2015.

According to Google research done by Aetna International, one of the world’s leading health benefits providers, the most searched-for weight loss programs online were two high-protein, low-carb diets: The Dukan Diet and Atkins.


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The Ultimate Paleo Grocery List: Prepping Your Paleo Meals Made Easy

eggs, chicken, vegetables and text paleo diet

If you’re following the Paleo diet you already know that grocery shopping and meal planning are going to be key to your weight loss success.

The Paleo diet, also known as the Caveman Diet, only permits foods that were available and consumed 10,000 years ago, during the Paleolithic era. Because there was no agriculture at this time, the Paleo diet prohibits most foods people rely on – and in some cases, eat exclusively – in today’s society, like grains, sugar and dairy. Simply put: if a you couldn’t eat it as a caveman, you can’t eat it on Paleo.

Ok, to do the diet you’re going to need to know more than that. We’ve got you covered.


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Paleo Vs. Whole30: The Big Differences Between the Biggest Clean-Eating Diets

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Ironically, you’d have to have been living in a cave to not be somewhat familiar with the paleo diet. It was massively popular in 2014, and it doesn’t appear to be losing any steam as we start 2015. The diet that encourages eating like our ancestors has become a major player in the health and fitness industry, sparking interest in many other similar diets.

One such program is Whole30. In fact, the two are often presented together, with Whole30 acting as a way to “try” going paleo. However, there are some small, yet significant differences between the two that can derail your diet if you’re not careful.

There’s no denying these diets are similar. To help you pick the right one for you, we’re breaking down what each diet is, as well as their similarities and differences.
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The Pegan Diet Dr. Mark Hyman and I Live By: Are You a Paleo-Vegan?

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As a health coach, it is my job to help guide my clients to find the best way of eating for them. A common response is, “Well, what works for you? How do you eat?” I struggle with this because I don’t want them to be subliminally influenced by my choices, but also because it never quite had a label. I have created some sort of hybrid diet that my body happens to thrive on. Lots of vegetables, nuts/seeds, good fats, some fruits, no dairy, minimal grains if possible, and mindfully sourced protein from both animals and plants.

It’s not quite paleo, and it’s not quite vegan. I had been calling it Plant-Based Paleo…but only in my own head.

Imagine my surprise when holistic physician and public health figure Dr. Mark Hyman — a regular columnist for the Huffington Post and contributor to the Katie Couric Show — posts an article to his website saying that he is Pegan a kind of hybridized version of paleo and vegan. Ha! I now feel strangely validated.
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