Diets in Review - Find the Right Diet for You

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The Color of Cutlery and How it Affects What We Eat

A team of white coats from Oxford University have published findings that will no doubt complicate your already muddled understanding of dieting. In Flavour Journal, the Brits reveal that taste, craving, and satisfaction of certain foods are determined by the manner in which they are served. Hors d’oeuvres are consumed more quickly when served on red plates, yogurt tastes better on a white spoon, and cheese tastes saltier when eaten off a knife. These findings, while great cocktail party fodder, could have a profound affect on your personal diet.

Cultery

Researchers Vanessa Harrar and Charles Spence lead the study and used variables like weight, size, color, and shape of cutlery to determine whether or not sensory cues from earthenware influenced eating. “The results revealed that yogurt was perceived as denser and more expensive when tasted from a lighter plastic spoon,” they said. “Food was rated as being saltiest when sampled from a knife rather than from a spoon, fork, or toothpick.” These seemingly trivial findings show that how we eat could be just as important as what we eat.
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Find the Right Diet for Your Personality in “Who Are You Meant To Be”

Every year, more new diets pop up claiming to be revolutionary and suitable for everyone. And every year, millions try them out, hoping that they’ll finally find the solution to losing weight.

Dr. Anne Dranitsaris, PhD and Heather Dranitsaris-Hilliard believe that this model is not how weight loss should be approached. In their new book, Who Are You Meant to Be?, released January 1, 2013, they outline how an individual’s personality affects their behavior and, in turn, their dieting styles.

“We’re looking at [dieting] through a different lens than most. What is it that’s driving our behaviors? Why do we people behave like we do around food?” said Dranitsaris-Hilliard.

The mother-and-daughter team’s book is not a diet guide, but it may be applied toward eating styles as part of an integrated look at human behavior. Through their research, they have identified eight different “striving styles” and find most individuals fall under one of these.
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Dr. Oz Promotes ‘Fat-urday’ Cheat Day for Weight Loss

Does the thought of cheating on your diet get you excited? It does me. I eat clean Monday through Friday and once the weekend rolls around, visions of hamburgers and chocolate bars start swirling my mind. And because I believe in balance I don’t consider indulging ‘cheating,’ but rather allowing myself an occasional treat as a ‘reward’ in a sense. In fact, I eat ice cream and pizza just about every Sunday and I don’t feel bad about it since it’s a rare occurrence.

Apparently, having a ‘cheat day’ is quite a popular topic as Dr. Oz is dedicating an entire show to the idea. He’s calling it ‘Fat-urday,’ saying we should eat whatever we want one day of the week because it will lead to more weight loss.

This means if you eat healthy the six days of the week, Dr. Oz is giving you a license to eat whatever you want on Saturday be it donuts, milkshakes or an entire plate of french fries. Or all three!
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New Study Shows People-Pleasers Eat More at Social Gatherings

Finally, an explanation as to why so many people tend to eat more food at social gatherings than in any other situation.

A new study shows that individuals who tend to be people-pleasers were found more likely to eat equal amounts of food as their peers, or more in order to make others feel comfortable, as compared to those who care less about making others happy.

The study examined 100 college students who were required to take a questionnaire to assess their sociotropy, a personality trait associated with people-pleasing. The students who scored high in people-pleasing categories were those who said they ‘tended to put others’ needs before their own, worried about hurting others, and were sensitive to criticism, among other behaviors.’
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How To Prevent and Stop a Binge This Holiday Season

It’s so easy to overdo it during holiday events. Family gatherings often include obscene amounts of food in all their richest forms. It may be that you simply want to sample all the special dishes that you have not had since last year. It may be that it just doesn’t feel like Thanksgiving without the green bean casserole or it doesn’t feel like Christmas without the eggnog. It may be that you have eaten too many sweets and feel like something salty will help you feel better, or you catch yourself alternating between salty and sweet. It may be that you are mindlessly grazing on all the finger foods while catching up with family members. You may even be getting encouragement to eat more from well meaning family members. Any of those things and more can encourage you to eat too much.

For some the danger is simply eating more than intended or indulging in a food item that you have removed from your diet. When you are trying to lose weight, counting calories often becomes extremely important. When you are trying to get healthier, there are often certain foods that are best to avoid. Overindulging during the holidays can delay reaching our goals. For others the danger goes beyond simply over eating and could be considered a binge. While special foods are often part of the enjoyment of the holiday season, feeling uncomfortable from eating to much is never enjoyable.


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