Diets in Review - Find the Right Diet for You

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Lack of Magnesium Leads to Chronic Disease

Missing the trace mineral magnesium in your diet can lead to a host of chronic health disorders that are often misdiagnosed. Magnesium is required in over 350 different enzymes, plus hundreds of essential functions in the body. In her informative book, The Miracle of Magnesium, Dr. Carolyn Dean writes that there has been a gradual decline of dietary magnesium in the United States, from a high of 500 mg/day at the turn of the century to barely 175-225 mg/day in 2010. Recommended dose for women over 30 years of age can be 320 mg per day.

Much of the cause for this decline has been linked to industrial farming and food processing. If the soil we grow our food in is lacking essential minerals, than the vegetables, grains, fruits, beans, legumes, seeds, and nuts are lacking those minerals as well. A hefty percentage of magnesium is also lost when removing the bran from grains in the refining process.

According to the National Academy of Sciences, Americans are critically lacking in adequate amounts of magnesium with men receiving only 80 percent of the recommended daily allowance and women receiving only 70 percent. This lack of magnesium can lead to a list of common health disorders. The irony is that many of the pharmaceutical drugs used to treat these conditions only deplete magnesium and other essential minerals further. If you suffer from any of these health conditions or know of someone who does, consult your doctor and have your levels of magnesium checked. Taking supplemental magnesium and eating foods high in the mineral can help to reverse these conditions.


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Healthy Cholesterol Can Be Achieved Through Healthy Fats

High nutrient and whole foods: FOR THE WIN! A recent study was conducted to evaluate the effects of diet on cholesterol. It was observed that people who ate food such as nuts, soy, avocado, olive oil, and oats saw a greater drop in cholesterol than those who maintained a low-fat diet.

A 6-month study was conducted in four different locations in Canada. Two groups of participants were selected and all had elevated cholesterol levels. One group was put on a diet that included foods believed to improve heart health, yet were high in healthy fats. The other group was placed on a diet that emphasized low-fat foods, including whole grains and high-fiber options.

The first group obtained their food list from a US Food and Drug Administration list. This list contained approved suggestions for better heart health. Foods on that list included olive oil, avocado, oatmeal, soy, tofu, beans, lentils, almonds, hazelnuts, peanuts, pecans, pistachios, and walnuts. Many of these foods contain high fat levels. However, they are natural and healthy fats.


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Go Nuts to Control Your Diabetes

An international study has revealed that 350 million people worldwide suffer from diabetes. The new estimate is tens of millions higher than the previous estimate. Scientists blame the growing epidemic on the spread of Western-style nutrition. By “Western” they mean too much fatty meats and processed foods.

If you already suffer from diabetes, what you need to do is make wiser choices within our so-called Western diet. One easy way to combat diabetes is having a daily snack that includes nuts.

According to new research from St. Michael’s Hospital and the University of Toronto, eating nuts on a daily basis can help control type 2 diabetes and even prevent complications associated with it. Researchers have found that eating two ounces of nuts every day was effective at glycemic and serum lipid control for people who already have type 2 diabetes.
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Inca Peanuts, an Ancient Superfood, Beneficial for Health and Weight Loss

Inca peanuts, also called sacha inchi nuts, are cultivated in the Andes Mountains of Peru. Loved for centuries by the Incas, Inca peanuts have recently been plugged by Dr. Oz as a superfood.

Historians believe that the sacha inchi plant (which produces the seeds we know as Inca peanuts) has been used by the natives of Peru for over 3,000 years. Images of the sacha inchi plant in Incan tombs are thought to be proof of this long-ago cultivation. The seeds are shelled and eaten raw, roasted, with sugar on top, or as an oil in traditional recipes. It’s also used as a cosmetic facial cream in some areas.

For those of us who live far from the Andes, Inca peanuts remain elusive. It can be hard to find them and the high cost of special ordering deters a lot of people so don’t be afraid to start off with a small order. Hopefully, availability will increase as time goes on and more people show an interest in the new health food- although there’s really nothing new about a centuries-old Amazonian plant.


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New Study Dubs Pistachios the “Skinny Nut”

the skinny nutA new study presented at the Experimental Biology conference in Washington, D.C. last week found that pistachios may be the ideal snack to aid in weight loss. Researchers discovered that not all of the nuts’ fat is absorbed by the body, making them slightly lower in calories than was previously thought. The findings work against the typically held idea that nuts are too high in calories and fat to make them good weight-loss aids.

“What we found is that when people consume the nuts, all the fat wasn’t absorbed by the body and therefore the calories weren’t all available to the body,” lead researcher Dr. David Baer told DietsInReview.

Researchers placed 52 overweight and obese subjects on 500-calorie deficit diets. Half were assigned to a group that ate pretzels as a snack, and the other group was given a pistachio snack. After 12 weeks, the pistachio group had more success in reaching their weight-loss goals.


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