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3 Ways Yoga Supports a Healthy Lifestyle

Nearly everyone has aspirations to be healthy. Following diets and new and improved workout plans are popular behaviors at the beginning of each New Year, as many will vow to eat better and get more exercise.

A few months of eating fresh, high quality cuisine and hitting the gym makes a big difference in the way we feel. A slimmer waistline, clearer skin, and an overall feeling of health is worth it, so why is it so hard to stay the course?

Your lifestyle plays a huge role in whether or not your good intentions are going to stick. If you think your lifestyle might not be supporting your desire to be healthy, keep reading.
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Get Back to Diet Basics in 2013 with Low-Fat, Low-Carb, Low-Sodium, and High-Fiber Diets

With a new year comes tons of resolutions. Most people vow to lose weight with lots of exercising, but they forget to change their diet to accommodate their workouts. While a healthy diet can help shed pounds effectively, eating healthy doesn’t mean you have to deprive yourself. A healthy diet should leave you feeling energized and stabilize your mood, not to mention satisfied. With thousands of diets out on the market we recommend choosing from one of the four diets: low-fat diet, low-carb diet, low-sodium diet, and high-fiber diet.


When you combine the primary principles of each of these very basic diet ideals, you get a pretty well-rounded healthful approach to eating that can be summarized as “Paleo-ish,” according to Biggest Loser dietitian Cheryl Forberg, RD. Since you are eating no grains (low carb), no dairy (lower fat), nothing processed (no added sodium), and unlimited fruits and vegetables (high fiber) it becomes strikingly similar to the Paleo, or caveman, diet.

Bonnie Taub-Dix, author of Read It Before You Eat It and nutrition expert in New York, also commented on how all four diets could work well together if one chooses to eat a low-fat, low-carb, low-sodium, and high-fiber diet.

“We have a diabetes epidemic and a high-fiber and low-carb diet can help control blood sugar levels. There is a large percentage of people with diabetes who should keep an eye on sodium and fat intake because eating a low-fat and -sodium diet can control heart disease and blood pressure.”

Learn more about each of these diets and see how one or some might suit your health and weight loss goals.
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Cindy Santa Ana Dropped 50 Pounds and 4 Medications With a Clean Diet

Cindy Santa Ana of Northern Virginia grew up like a lot of kids in the 70s, eating canned Campbell’s soups and Pop Tarts and school lunches that resembled fast food more than they did home-cooked meals. She also had an affinity for popsicles and candy, which all snowballed into a pattern of unhealthy eating. The only commitments that kept her slim through high school were going without soda, dancing and staying active with social engagements.

Despite any unhealthy habits she developed early on in life, Cindy always had an interest in health and fitness and even majored in physical education and health in college. As a result she followed the nutrition advice she learned in the process, following the USDA recommendation of 6-11 servings of carbohydrates per day.

Items like breads, pasta and cereal filled her daily diet, but  all along she thought that was a healthy choice.

“At one point in college I had 11 boxes of cereal in my dorm room,” Cindy recalled. “I was also eating everything fat free because the fat-free mantra was on.”

Believing the basic assumption that fat was bad, everything she ate was either low fat or fat free, which meant it usually had ample amounts of added sugar and high fructose corn syrup. This pattern of eating led to a slow and steady weight gain throughout college – at least 10 pounds every year. And Cindy’s health only continued to decline.

At the age of 25 she was diagnosed with hypothyroidism and the migraines she frequently experienced as a kid only grew worse. Then in 2005 and again in 2007 kids came along, which left Cindy heavier and more unhappy with her body than ever.
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3 Thoughtful Reasons For Taking Up Yoga in the New Year

The popularity of yoga has been on the rise for quite some time. From Bikram’s hot yoga to Anne Anderson’s snow yoga (Snowga), there are styles sure to assuage all types of desires.

Although there are an estimated 22 million people practicing yoga today, a large number of American’s have yet to give it a whirl. If you are in need of a little coaxing to join a yoga class, check out the following reasons why making it your New Year’s resolution might be of benefit to your health and happiness.

You will learn more about yourself

You might be 60 years old and seemingly privy to all of your nuances and inner workings, but there will always be just a little bit more about yourself you can learn.

The word yoga means ‘to yok’ or ‘to join.’ The true purpose of yoga is to unite mind, body and spirit. In the process of this yoking, we discover parts of ourselves that we had no idea existed. This awakening is worth the effort, and it is what makes yoga so much more than just exercise and stretching.
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Mind Over Matter Needed to Achieve Health Goals in the New Year

As we approach the beginning of another new year, many will be setting the intention to get back into a healthy exercise routine. Whether it is jogging, stationary bicycle riding, or attending yoga classes with regularity, the motivation to get with the program takes some determination.

Benjamin Franklin once said, “You can do anything you set your mind to.” Once your mind is set, the rest is easy. The challenging part is getting over the hump of doubt, impatience, and discouragement.

The following are a few tips that will help you set your mind to your goals so you may find success in making your healthy intentions a reality.

Create a mantra

A mantra is a word or group of words used to sharpen your focus during meditation. Although you might not actually be meditating when you repeat your mantra, it will still have an effect on your mind.

When you create a personal mantra, choose words that support your intention, such as “I have energy,” or “I love yoga.” Your mind will soon start believing whatever it is you are telling yourself, so choose your words wisely.
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