Diets in Review - Find the Right Diet for You

moderation



Tips to Improve Your Nutrition from HealthiNation’s Sharon Richter, RD

Recently we reported on a study by HealthiNation that revealed that Americans have an overly optimistic view of their nutritional well being. While majority of adults (52%) think that they are doing all they can do to achieve a balanced nutritional diet, 76% of adults are not getting the minimum daily serving of fruits and vegetables as recommended by the USDA.

To help close the gap between that optimism and the sober reality, we caught up with Sharon Richter, RD, a registered dietitian who is passionate about helping people understand the impact diet and nutrition have on their overall health. Based in New York City, Richter hosts HealthiNation’s nutrition programs and has a private practice where she counsels clients about sports nutrition, weight loss/gain, eating disorders, and disease prevention for children, adolescents and adults.

“I recommend that people try to achieve balance,” said Richter. “If you eat healthy 80% of the time and ensure that you’re meeting all of your dietary needs, you can indulge a little bit during the other 20% of the time.”


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Learning Moderation Puts an End to the Dieting Cycle

Heather is the author of Not a DIY Life, where she shares her journey of healthy living, parenting, faith and everything in between. After all, life is not a Do-It-Yourself project.

I’m not really a professional dieter, but I have struggled with my weight most of my adult life. I’ve tried several different “diets,” including a low-fat diet, Atkins, and South Beach. Even though I am losing weight currently, I am not on a diet in the same sense. I am on a journey of healthy living, and that includes learning moderation in all things.

When I was in college, I lost 50 lbs on a low-fat diet with lots of activity and exercise. During that time, I gave up bacon. Oh, how I missed bacon. But it wasn’t “low fat” so I thought that I “couldn’t” eat it. I did not eat bacon for SIX years.


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Commit to Shape-Up Week with Alison Sweeney

Alison Sweeney announced on her Twitter page March 14th that she is starting a Shape-Up Week, using the hashtag #shapeupweek, the specifics of which she outlines in her book, The Mommy Diet.

Shape-Up Week is a week of clean eating, consistent exercise, and no slip-ups. It doesn’t fall on a specific calendar day, it’s any week you feel as though you need one to get back on track and kickstart your results and motivation. Your Shape-Up Week can be any week you choose- it is just a week where you recommit to your goals, and stick to them for an entire week.

According to Ali’s website, “…the bottom line is that this week I am going to focus on my health and fitness. It’s not just like any other week, when I work at health and fitness but win some and lose some.This week I am 100% goal-oriented. No sweets, no treats, no excuses.”


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Drinking Wine as Part of a Heart Healthy Diet

Guest blogger, Vicki L. VanArsdale is a freelance writer, certified personal trainer and nutrition consultant. By adopting a healthy and active lifestyle, she has lost 100 lbs. Her mission is to motivate and inspire people through her actions and words. Get healthy from the inside, out is her motto. Learn more on Vicki’s blog.

Did you know that a glass of wine can be considered part of a healthy lifestyle? For those who live in other parts of the world, a glass of wine is common with meals. Here in the U.S., the problem is binge drinking. But having a glass of wine once in a while is just fine.

Many studies indicate that moderate amounts of red wine lowers the risk of heart disease and may raise high density lipoprotein (HDL), which is known as the “good” cholesterol. Moderate means one glass of wine per day for women and two for men.  The American Heart Association says one serving of wine is four ounces, so be vigilant with your serving size. And women who have the breast cancer gene should avoid alcohol because of its potential to increase risk of the disease.
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How to Follow the New Dietary Guidelines

In 2005 the US Department of Agriculture’s Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion made major changes to the Food Guide Pyramid. Vertical stripes replaced the building blocks to help represent moderation by the narrowing of each group from bottom to top, proportionality by the different widths of the stripes, variety by the new colors introduced, and the importance of physical activity and gradual improvement through the steps and slogan “Steps to a Healthier You”.

Recently, the USDA released new dietary guidelines for 2010, but the changes aren’t nearly as drastic. As Kelly said so well, “While it may be surprising that not much has changed since 2005 when our health obviously has, the new 2010 Dietary Guidelines show that how to eat healthy hasn’t changed, we just need to follow the guidelines now more than ever.” So just how do you follow the Dietary Guidelines for health and even weight loss? I have been teaching clients how to do this for the last five years with the help of the USDA and MyPyramid.gov.


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