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Digital Weight Loss Consultations on Expertory Virtually Eliminate All Excuses for Skipping Meetings

A lot of us these days are extremely busy. It seems as though we barely have time to do the important things in life, like taking care of our health (or those long naps on a comfy couch, who am I kidding?!). It is increasingly difficult to be able to budget our precious time to make it out somewhere to achieve our health goals. Being that we are so connected to those crazy interwebs these days, I figured I would try to take care of my wellness through an online format. Enter: Expertory.

skype-call
Expertory is a website dedicated to educating on YOUR terms, not the schedule of someone else you have to work around. I had no excuse like “Oh, I can’t make it at this time because of this, or this time because of that.” Your workouts or counseling sessions are achieved through video chats that you schedule with their enormous panel of experts, which range from fitness and nutrition experts to people who can teach you to speak Mandarin!

Being several years off of the Biggest Loser, I have a stubborn 20 pounds I wish to lose which have crept back on me (much better than the 213 pounds I had to lose originally!). I am pretty happy where I am now, as I am fit and healthy beyond my wildest dreams, but just want to tone up a bit more. Since I work out like a fiend, I know it is my diet that needs cleaning up, which is why I decided to book a session with Amy Goldsmith, a nutritionist, whose session was titled “Boosting Your Metabolism.”
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Could Cold Temperatures Help You Lose Weight?

Ray Cronise, a former NASA scientist who spent 15 years overseeing experiments aboard shuttles at Marshall Space Flight Center, has been conducting experiments since 2008 to see if cold temperatures have an effect on the metabolism.

In 2008 while watching a televised program on Olympic swimmer, Michael Phelps, Cronise got an idea. The documentary claimed that the swimmer was consuming around 12,000 calories a day while training. That fact didn’t make sense to Cronise considering his own calorie-restricted diet allowed him to have only 12,000 calories per week.

At the time Cronise weighed 209 pounds at 5 feet 9 inches tall, and was trying to get down to 180 pounds. He thought to himself, if Phelps was really consuming that many calories daily and was in the water three hours a day, then something didn’t add up because the swimmer would become a “blob.”
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Why Calorie Counting Fails and How to Burn Fat Without It

Which of the following statements are true?

a. A pound of feathers weighs the same as a pound of lead.
b. We have to consciously decrease calories in or increase calories out in order to burn fat.
c. All triangles have three sides.

If we believe what we’ve been taught, A, B, and C are all true. However, it may come as a surprise (or not, considering the dramatic rise in obesity) that biologists have known for a long time that B is false. We do not need to consciously eat less or exercise more in order to burn fat.

How’s this possible?

There are at least three major biological missteps with calorie counting:

1. It assumes calories out is fixed.
2. It assumes we can calculate calories out.
3. It assumes fewer calories in or more calories out requires the body to burn fat. 
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How Much Sleep Do You Really Need? New Research Points to a Magic Number

By Bob Greene for BestLifeDiet.com

How many hours of sleep did you get last night? If you answered seven (or right around there), then you’re in great shape—seven seems to be the magic number for sleep, according to new preliminary research.

You may already know that skimping on shuteye is associated with a number of problems. Your ability to focus and your reflexes are impaired, which can lead to accidents and decreased productivity. Then, there’s a whole host of physical changes that occur when you’re sleep deprived. For instance, your metabolism slows down and your body pumps out more ghrelin, the hunger hormone, and less leptin, the hormone that signals fullness, putting you at an increased risk for obesity and diabetes.

That’s enough to make you want to pull the covers over your head! But researchers from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston found that too much sleep is not good for you either. In fact, it seems to impair memory and brain function.

Using data collected from 120,000 nurses who are part of the Nurse’s Health Study, the researchers found that those who logged less than five or more than nine hours of slumber per night scored lower on cognitive tests than those who slept around seven. (They presented their findings at the recent Alzheimer’s Association International Conference.) That means that logging the right amount of sleep may help keep your brain sharp and potentially protect against dementia as you get older.
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‘Eat More, Exercise Less’ is Jonathan Bailor’s Mantra in The Smarter Science of Slim

“Long-term health and fitness is about the quality of food we eat and exercise we get, not the quantity.” This is how Jonathan Bailor sums up the research found in his new book, “The Smarter Science of Slim. Scientific Proof. Fat Loss Facts!” The book is full of research that points to so many flaws in our current beliefs on dieting and exercise. It’s research that men and women around the country have been relying on to help them finally breakthrough their weight loss; it’s also been assisting former Biggest Loser contestants after they leave the infamous ranch.

A catchy line throughout the book and the press info regarding the book is “eat more, exercise less.” It isn’t a catchy marketing line for Bailor to sell a diet pill, a weight loss device, or even a plan, it sums up the science and research he presents in the book.

Bailor explained that the science in his book is “shockingly different from marketing and common dieting myths.” It shows that the key to long-term fat loss and improved health is in the consumption of satisfying, unaggressive, nutritious foods like water-, fiber- and protein-rich non-starchy vegetables, nutrient-dense proteins, and whole food natural fats. When we eat this way, he explains that we’re too full for dry, low-fiber, and protein-poor starches and sweets, like bread, candy, cake, soda, and juice.
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