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low sodium diet



Prevention Magazine Announces 100 Cleanest Packed Foods. All Yum. No Guilt.

At Diets In Review we’re big fans of eating clean and lean because we know fresh food is the absolute best for you and your family. We also know “life happens,” and sometimes you just want to rip open a box from the freezer, microwave it and call it dinner.

Recently, Prevention Magazine announced their top 100 Cleanest Packaged Food Awards. That’s 100 reasons to stop shunning your pantry and serve up a guilt-free meal.

Kathie Lee and Hoda briefly put down their wine to chat with Prevention Magazine’s Siobhan O’Connor, who stopped by with a few award-winning items.

Want more? Here are 6 additional packaged foods that got a thumbs-up from Prevention:

Morning Star Farms Sausage Patties
 - Made with organic soy. Contains way less fat than pork. So tasty you might forget you’re eating a meat-ish patty
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Get Back to Diet Basics in 2013 with Low-Fat, Low-Carb, Low-Sodium, and High-Fiber Diets

With a new year comes tons of resolutions. Most people vow to lose weight with lots of exercising, but they forget to change their diet to accommodate their workouts. While a healthy diet can help shed pounds effectively, eating healthy doesn’t mean you have to deprive yourself. A healthy diet should leave you feeling energized and stabilize your mood, not to mention satisfied. With thousands of diets out on the market we recommend choosing from one of the four diets: low-fat diet, low-carb diet, low-sodium diet, and high-fiber diet.


When you combine the primary principles of each of these very basic diet ideals, you get a pretty well-rounded healthful approach to eating that can be summarized as “Paleo-ish,” according to Biggest Loser dietitian Cheryl Forberg, RD. Since you are eating no grains (low carb), no dairy (lower fat), nothing processed (no added sodium), and unlimited fruits and vegetables (high fiber) it becomes strikingly similar to the Paleo, or caveman, diet.

Bonnie Taub-Dix, author of Read It Before You Eat It and nutrition expert in New York, also commented on how all four diets could work well together if one chooses to eat a low-fat, low-carb, low-sodium, and high-fiber diet.

“We have a diabetes epidemic and a high-fiber and low-carb diet can help control blood sugar levels. There is a large percentage of people with diabetes who should keep an eye on sodium and fat intake because eating a low-fat and -sodium diet can control heart disease and blood pressure.”

Learn more about each of these diets and see how one or some might suit your health and weight loss goals.
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10 Pounds Down in 21 Days with The Digest Diet

By Jill Sandberg

First of all I’d like to say thanks to Brandi at DietsInReview.com for asking me if I’d like to participate in the Blogging It Off Challenge. I think she knew I was struggling to lose some weight and needed a push. I’d also say thanks to the team at Digest Diet. They’ve really done an excellent job in creating an easy-to-use diet that has made me a believer.

OK, so the final day of the 21 day Digest Diet was here. I was dreading this weigh-in a bit because I went out to eat twice this weekend. With that said, I was pleasantly surprised when I stripped down to weigh myself (yea – you know you do this too), I had lost a total of 10 pounds in 21 days. *golf clap* *taking a bow*

Of course the majority of this came from the first 4-7 days. Going to a low-sodium / low-carb diet flushed out all the excess water weight I was carrying.
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50 Years of Consuming Too Much Salt Despite Warnings

Most of us already know that too much salt isn’t a good thing. Yet what’s surprising is that despite decades of warnings to reduce sodium intake, Americans continue to over-consume the flavorful staple in most households. A new Harvard study shows that our salt intake really hasn’t changed over the past 50 years, and it seems like that intake is hardwired and not easy to change no matter how many PSAs or dietitian visits we have.

As more processed foods hit our shelves and as obesity rates continue to soar, it almost seems as though sodium levels would have continued to increase, not necessarily stay the same. Yet, after multiple studies were reviewed, all occuring between 1957 and 2003, it appears that 3700 milligrams of sodium was consistently consumed over the years. Of course, other measures of our sodium intake don’t necessarily reflect the same pattern. In fact, the NHANES, or National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey,  does indeed show an increase in salt consumption. The biggest difference between these survey results and that observed in the Harvard study is that the NHANES relies on food records where as the Harvard study took a look at urinary sodium output which is supposedly more accurate.

Current guidelines for sodium intake are 2300 milligrams a day for healthy adults and 1500 milligrams a day for those at risk of high blood pressure. That’s quite a difference. And although this message has been touted for over twenty years, it appears that few are following it or that these recommendations are too stringent for the majority of Americans.

Elevated sodium intake isn’t just occurring in American populations though. In fact, the average sodium intake appears to be similar on an international level. This means that there may be more to this whole sodium intake thing than we think. It also begs the question- are our recommendations wrong?


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Couscous with Chickpeas, Dried Fruit, and Cilantro

Even though American Heart Month has passed, it’s still important to keep an eye on the levels of sodium in your diet, regardless of age or weight. Low-sodium diets are often prescribed to prevent or treat many health issues and conditions. While salt is certainly a popular seasoning for many foods, meals low in sodium aren’t necessarily low in taste.

Couscous is a grain dish that originated in North Africa and consists of small granules that are usually made with ground semolina and wheat flour. Pair this good-for-you-grain with  low-salt beans and the sweetness of orange, apricot, and cranberry for a meatless dish so tasty you’ll never know you’re eating healthy.


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