Tag Archives: liz neporent

Join Thin In 10’s Jessica Smith for a New Year Twitter Party!

We want to spend the new year with you and help to kick-off those resolutions and goals.

Join us with Jessica Smith, respected fitness expert and co-author of Thin In 10, for a fun, informative, and motivating hour on New Year’s night! We’ll talk indulgences, goals, and how to actually make this your last resolution.

Where: Use hashtag #TI10

Who: Follow @DietsInReview and @JessicaSmithTV

When: January 1, 2013 at 9:00p EST / 8:00p CST

Giveaways: Thin In 10, 3 Jessica Smith workout DVDs, and DIR schwag! (more…)

Jessica Smith’s Thin in 10 Plan Sheds Pounds with Ten Minutes a Day

Losing weight is not easy. Jessica Smith agrees because, although she now appears toned and beautiful, she admits it wasn’t always this way. So she and Liz Neporent, a best selling health author, wrote a book about losing weight to help others on their paths to success. It’s called The Thin in 10 Weight-Loss Plan, and she truly believes it can help those who need to shed pounds but have not been able to take that crucial first step to a healthier lifestyle.

Smith tells about her journey in the introduction of the book: “Jessica once tipped the scales at 170 pounds. She tried various diets, exercise plans, motivational programs—you name it, she tried it—but nothing worked. While some plans seemed to work at first, the success was always short-lived. She’d always gain the weight back and then some.”

Any of that sound familiar? One day, Smith had enough and decided to do something about it. Instead of grabbing for another candy bar to soothe her frustrations, she hopped on a stationary bike, telling herself she could have the candy bar after ten minutes. “While those 10 minutes were pretty rough, she felt great afterward—and she had lost the urge to dig into the chocolate,” the book says.  (more…)

How Private Health Saved One Journalist’s Life

Cost is always an issue when it comes to health care, but if the coverage and care are still poor, what are we really paying for?

This is a question Leslie Michelson, CEO of Private Health Management, asked after spending nearly 30 years in the health-care business and noticing something was wrong that needed to be fixed.

His solution? A private health care network which he founded in 2007 that provides high value service – both in cost and quality – to ensure people receive the best care available to them regardless of their diagnosis.

Some Americans are pleased with the health coverage they’re receiving, according to a 2009 Kaiser Family Foundation study on American’s Satisfaction with Insurance Coverage. It found that most people were satisfied with their coverage and care. However, the full synopsis revealed this wasn’t necessarily the whole story.

“…Significant portions of those who rate their insurance positively still say they face problems paying their medical bills or are dissatisfied with certain aspects of their coverage. Additionally…substantial portions of insured people are concerned about the cost of their health care and insurance, the adequacy of their insurance to meet potential health care needs, and the stability of their insurance coverage.”

One area this survey did not gauge was the level of care for people facing serious health problems, such as a cancer diagnosis or lung or heart disease. These are the areas in which companies like Private Health perform best as they are able to quickly connect patients in extreme need with the best doctors available to them.

As some might expect, this service doesn’t come cheap. As reported by The Wall Street Journal, Private Health primarily caters to “high net worth individuals” and to businesses that use its services as a benefit to their executives. Michelson reports that Private Health currently serves between 12,000 and 15,000 clients, mainly in ‘private equity, hedge funds, professional and financial services firms.’

By establishing strategic patient-physician relationships that are difficult and often dizzying for a person to establish on his or her own, Michelson suggests that people can avoid the run around and find the best doctor to treat their condition when using Private Health – and that is worth the extra money.

Liz Neporent, health expert and ABC News writer, believes in this service firmly and chose Private Health after receiving a life-threatening diagnosis earlier this year. As with many others in her circumstance, Neporent felt that the odds were so stacked against her both from an insurance and medical point of view that professional help from someone who could better navigate the system was extremely valuable. (more…)

Scientists Discover Beige Fat Cells, Could be Key in Fighting Obesity

Everyone knows fat is a bad thing if you have too much of it. But what everyone may not realize is that some types of fat are better than others. Yes, there are multiple kinds of fat. Let’s start with a breakdown:

White fat, or bad fat, stores calories and acts as somewhat of a lame duck, just sitting in the body and not doing anything productive. White fat is predominantly found in obese individuals.

Brown fat, on the other hand, which is present in all humans during infant years and dwindles as we age, has been found to produce heat, burn calories and help control weight. When brown fat is lost in the body, it’s replaced by white fat, and is most often found in people who are active, especially athletes. (more…)

Mary Hartley to Present on Intuitive Eating at the Women’s Health and Fitness Expo

Next month, DietsInReview.com is going on a road trip to Upstate New York to help get the women and families of that community on the right track for health. We’ll be attending the one-day Women’s Health and Fitness Expo on May 19, 2012. More than 8,000 people will turn out to spend a day learning about nutrition, fitness, disease prevention, and to receive health screenings and even spa treatments.

Our resident dietitian, Mary Hartley, RD, will be presenting one of the keynotes, discussing the practice of intuitive eating. It’s something she employs in her own life, and after decades of working as a clinical dietitian, something she knows works for living a healthy, balanced life.

Throughout the day, Expo attendees can visit the DietsInReview.com booth to meet Mary and have a one-on-one nutrition Q&A with her, as well as determine your caloric needs for weight loss or maintenance. As well, our editor Brandi Koskie will be on hand to make sure you leave with some great DIR goodies!

We won’t be in the booth alone, though. Bernie Salazar, Biggest Loser season 5 at-home winner and our very first Biggest Loser correspondent, will be on hand to introduce everyone to his children’s fitness book, Monstercize. Health editor Liz Neporent will be available to sign books, and fitness expert Jessica Smith will be signing DVDs. (more…)

Join a Migraine and Diet Twitter Chat on January 30

Is your diet the cause of your killer migraines? Can changing what you eat really make a difference in the intensity and frequency of your headaches?  Join DietsInReview.com’s Migraines & Diet Twitter chat (#DIRMigraine) on Monday, January 30 to find out how changing what you eat may – or may not – help ease migraine pain.

Our hosts are Harvard Medical School headache specialists Paul Rizzoli, MD and Elizabeth Loder, MD plus health writer Liz Neporent. As authors of the brand new book, Harvard Medical School’s The Migraine Solution, they’ll answer all of your questions about food triggers and migraine management.

DIR’s Migraine & Diet Twitter Chat

Where: Twitter.com/DietsInReview, @DietsInReview

When: Monday, January 30, 2012 at 8:00p EST / 7:00p CST

Hashtag: #DIRMigraine

No RSVP is necessary! (more…)

Fighting Food-Related Headaches with The Migraine Solution

It’s hard to imagine fearing an orange. Or a teaspoon of vinegar. Or a banana. But that’s exactly how many people feel. They’re convinced that eating certain foods will bring on a major whopper of a headache. Is this a legit concern?

“Although many people believe that some foods may trigger a migraine, the evidence remains a bit fuzzy,” says Elizabeth Loder, MD, MPH, the chief of the Division of Headache and Pain at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston and who along with Paul Rizzoli MD wrote the just-released The Migraine Solution.

Loder points out that it’s especially challenging to track food triggers because different foods may affect different people in different ways. There’s also no consensus about how long it might take a dietary culprit to set off a headache so it’s difficult to pin down which foods are the real trouble makers.

For example, chocolate is one food in particular where the research is mixed. You may believe that chocolate sets off a migraine, but Loder notes that a craving for chocolate could be an early warning sign that a migraine is about to strike rather than its cause. “You have to be cautious and not jump to conclusions about how the two things are linked,” she points out. (more…)

Breast Cancer Surgery Recovery Aided by Lifting Weights

By Liz Neporent

Breast cancer survivors get ready for a game changer. Instead of sitting on the sidelines and avoiding physical activity for fear of aggravating the arm swelling experienced by up to 70 percent of surgery patients, experts are now recommending you pump iron.

For decades, breast cancer patients undergoing treatment have been warned away from lifting anything heavier than a small bag of groceries. The thought was overexertion might cause lymphedema, a painful, arm-swelling condition that’s a common side effect of surgery. Recent work by University of Pennsylvania scientists challenges this notion with findings that a carefully structured weight training program doesn’t make lymphedema worse. In fact, it can reduce the chances of arm swelling or even prevent it altogether.

The research involved 154 women who were diagnosed with breast cancer within the last few years and who had had at least two lymph nodes removed but hadn’t yet developed lymphedema. Half were told not to change their exercise habits. The rest attended twice weekly weight training sessions supervised by certified personal trainers. Routines got progressively more challenging over 13 weeks and then the women continued lifting on their own for up to nine months afterwards. (more…)