Diets in Review - Find the Right Diet for You

legs



How to Train Legs, Part II

steve hansonSteve Hanson has been studying health, fitness, and nutrition since 1996. While he now works as a software engineer and web developer, Steve spent several years as a personal trainer and sport nutritionist in southern NH. Steve runs a blog called Project Swole, where health-minded web surfers can go to learn to Build Muscle and Lose Fat more efficiently. Project Swole is a collection of articles, tips, and personal experiences that anyone can use to become stronger, leaner, and healthier.

The Workout Plan

In last week’s How to Train Legs Part I, I talked about the reasons why you should train your legs hard and hopefully helped you to establish some new goals for leg training. Today, I outline a workout to achieve those goals.
Read Full Post >



How to Train Legs, Part I

steve hansonSteve Hanson has been studying health, fitness, and nutrition since 1996. While he now works as a software engineer and web developer, Steve spent several years as a personal trainer and sport nutritionist in southern NH. Steve runs a blog called Project Swole, where health-minded web surfers can go to learn how to build muscle and lose fat more efficiently. Project Swole is a collection of articles, tips, and personal experiences that anyone can use to become stronger, leaner, and healthier.

The Missing Link

With average gym goers primarily concerned with the development of their upper body, many weight lifters forget or just neglect to train their legs. This becomes a problem with both men and women who are focusing on either building muscle or losing fat.

For men this is a problem because they are often focused on total body functional strength, or aesthetic symmetry and muscle size. For women this is a problem because they often spend too much time on endurance cardio, and end up missing the huge metabolic potential of leg training.

In order to properly integrate leg training into our routine, we need to know why, how, and when to train those wheels.
Read Full Post >



The Perfect Squat

There are several theories of working-out and exercising out there and the goal is to find what works for you. I went to a personal training conference recently and learned a few new ideas and squatting is one of them. squatsMost theories state that you should keep your back straight (or spine aligned)¬†and knees over your ankles. I feel that when you do perform a squat this way the pressure is greatest on the back. It’s definitely hard to keep your knees over your ankles and keep your back straight. I strongly believe that when performing “the perfect squat,” your lower body and upper body share the weight and pressure. The back and the shins should be parallel ( / / ). So, yes your knees should be “sticking out” over your feet, but remember to keep them parallel with the back. I also feel that squatting should be taken seriously cause it can cause so many problems or injuries if not performed correctly. Personally, I do not squat. I take advantage of the leg press and other machines for the smaller leg muscles. Lunges should also be performed like the squat, but please be very careful while performing these movements.

See how his back and shins are very close to being parallel. Please keep your feet pointed straight ahead and hip or shoulder width apart.

See more of Matt’s expert fitness tips.