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Lap-Band Surgery on Dr. Oz

Dr. OzTune in today, April 3rd to Dr. Oz for an in-depth look at Lap-Band surgery. In February, the FDA approved the use of lap-band weight loss surgery for people with a lower BMI, making in an option that’s available for many more Americans.

Dr. Oz talks to other experts in weight loss surgery about who should consider this procedure. Studies have show that Lap-Band surgery can help patients lose 18 percent of their starting body weight. Dr. Oz also talks to patients after they’ve had the surgery, to learn what it’s really like to live with the device.


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Gastric Bypass Superior to Lap-Band

A new study examined the two of the most popular weight loss surgeries, Lap-Band and gastric bypass, has come to the conclusion that gastric bypass is the better option. While the rate of complications in both procedures was about the same, gastric bypass surgery patients lost 64 percent of their excess weight after a year, while those who had the Lap-Band device placed only lost 36 percent of their excess weight.

“It’s a dramatic difference,” said Dr. Guilherme Campos of the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine in Madison.

Interestingly, previous studies have shown that gastric banding was safer than gastric bypass surgery.
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LAP Bands Approved by FDA for Wider Use

LAP Band

Lap Band

The Food and Drug Administration officially approved use of gastric bands, also known as Lap-Bands, for people with a BMI of 30 or higher and have an obesity-related health problem. The previous regulations only approved the device for people with a BMI of 40 and no additional health problems or a BMI of 35 with health complications. The new regulation is in accordance with recommendations made by an FDA panel in December.

Allergan, the maker of the Lap-Band, originally applied to lower the threshold to anyone with a BMI of 35, regardless of other health complications. However, the new provision only includes people with conditions such as diabetes or hypertension, the threshold for otherwise healthy people remains at a BMI of 40. “In order to target this therapy to patients who will benefit the most, the approved indication is limited to patients at the highest risk of obesity-related complications,” said Karen Riley, a spokeswoman for the FDA. According to The New York Times, an estimated 26 million Americans are now eligible for the surgery.


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South Carolina to Cover 100 Employees’ Weight Loss Surgeries

Starting in January, 100 obese South Carolina government workers will have a chance to get their weight loss surgery completely paid for.

Yahoo News reports that under the pilot program, South Carolina’s state employee insurance plan will cover weight loss surgery for 100 workers on a first come, first serve basis.

The test program was put in the 2010-11 budget to address the state’s growing obesity problem. The obesity rate in South Carolina has doubled since 1990, with an alarming 30 percent of adults classified as obese. According the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly two out three adults in South Carolina are overweight or obese.
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C.H.O.I.C.E. Campaign Takes Weight Loss to Washington

Is obesity a choice or a disease? Can it be both? Proponents of designating obesity as a disease say that it is a result of genetics and biological factors. On top of that, some diseases cause obesity.

But, opponents say that obesity is not a disease because it is the result of a person’s environment, lifestyle and eating habits.

Disease or not, one thing is sure: obesity is an epidemic. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that there were 72 million obese people in the United States, and 34.3 percent of adults considered obese.


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