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The Pros and Cons of a Beach Workout

Swimsuit season is in full effect. Across the country people have been hitting the gym to make sure their body is ready for one-pieces, two-pieces and maybe even no-pieces. If you’re tired of the gym, and have access, consider a workout on the beach. Like any workout, there are advantages and disadvantages. So before you dig your heels in to the sand, be sure you know how to get the best and safest workout at the beach.

I talked to Holly Perkins, a renowned fitness expert and New Balance Fitness Ambassador, about the pros and cons of working out at the beach. She gave me a great list of benefits someone can get while working out at the beach.

Beach Workout Pros



3 Yoga Rules Worth Keeping

Yoga styles are like snowflakes; there are no two exactly alike. While there may be major differences in every style, there are common rules for every yoga practice that are worth adhering to.

Put the following yoga rules at the top of your must-not-break list for all styles of yoga to ensure you’ll gain more enjoyment from your practice.

Rule #1 – honor your real limits

This is a tricky rule, because there are clearly two types of limits: Self-imposed limits and real limits. Self-imposed limits are those that we cling to when we are most likely afraid, unmotivated, or disinterested in improving. An example of a self-imposed limit is thinking you are completely unable to get better at yoga because you are too stiff. These types of limits can be broken, and yoga helps us do that.
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Bed Top Yoga DVD Makes Yoga Accessible to Those With Physical Limitations

Krishnamacharya, a classic Indian yoga teacher, used to say, “If you can breathe, you can do yoga.” So basically, as long as one is alive and breathing, a yoga practice is possible. Of course, it depends on the style and intensity of yoga, but the fact is that anyone can practice some type of yoga, as long as they can breathe.

Carol Dickman, a professional yoga teacher who holds several certifications, and who has shared her expertise on the TODAY Show, CNN, Fox News, and in places like the NBC corporate headquarters, has developed a video series to address and teach yoga to those with physical limitations that would otherwise be seemingly viewed as too disabling to do yoga.

Bed Top Yoga, Chair/Seated Yoga, and Balance Basics and Beyond are three of Dickman’s DVDs designed to bring relief to those with issues ranging from mild to severe. Recommended as resources for healthy living by Arthritis Today Magazine, Weight Watchers Magazine, The National Multiple Sclerosis Society, The Muscular Dystrophy Association, The National Amputee Coalition, The National Fibromyalgia Association, Dr. Andrew Weil, and hospice workers, these DVDs are built to suit those needing extreme modifications and gentle care.

In Bed Top Yoga, one can practice simple yet effective stretches and yoga poses on the bed, or on the floor. Bed Top Yoga is an ideal 33 minutes in length and closes with a sleep enhancing relaxation. It is more than appropriate for seniors, the physically challenged, or those with a visual impairment.

Yoga Journal calls Bed Top Yoga an intelligent and useful presentation with, “a cult following of former insomniacs,” also quoting that, “Dickman has a reassuring style, appropriate for an audience that might be reluctant to exercise because of injury, disability, or age.”

And so it goes, yoga’s health benefits can touch just about anyone. All someone needs is the ability to bring fresh air into their lungs and a willingness to give yoga a try.

Also Read:

Yoga for a Great Night’s Sleep

Sleep and Relax to Prevent Diabetes

Yoga for Arthritis 



Yoga Helps Bicyclists Get a Leg Up on Speed and Recovery

Super active quadriceps, strong hamstrings and monster gluteal muscles are what propel a road bike across pavement. Just take a look at the lower bodies of famed cyclists such as Lance Armstrong or Cadel Evans and you will see some serious power pent up in their legs. In professional racers, the contractibility of muscle fibers is beyond efficient, and the speed at which they fly up steep grades is unimaginable.

While we may not boast the title of ‘Tour de France winner,’ we can still enjoy trying our best in a local bike race or just having fun while riding along our neighborhood bike path. Either way, nursing our well-used legs is of great importance. Post ride or race, ice and massage are crucial for speed of recovery, and so is yoga.

The following yoga poses are superbly beneficial to anyone who enjoys spending time in the saddle, i.e. the bicycle seat.

Runner’s Lunge

You might as well call this ‘cyclist’s lunge,’ as it is helpful for runners and riders alike. With the front knee directly over the ankle and the back leg stretched as far back as possible (toes on the ground) the psoas muscle receives a lovely stretch for restoration of length and suppleness. In cycling, the psoas muscle is responsible for bringing the knee forward at the top of the pedal stroke, as well as keeping the pelvis stable while pedaling.
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Best Foods to Eat to Stop Exercise Pain Before it Starts

By Gale Tern

One of the best ways to lose weight and feel better is through exercise. Science tells us that regular exercise makes us healthier and increases our feelings of well-being. The release of chemicals within our bodies called endorphins is what induces that good feeling and even reduces our perception of pain. However, exercise sometimes comes with the price of soreness, aches and pain. But minor aches and pains should not prevent you from getting your workout on.

Here are some things you can do to prevent injury and the hurt that sometimes comes with exercise.  

Before Workout

1. Drink plenty of purified water throughout the day before you start exercising. This will hydrate your body and reduce cramping and soreness during and after your routine.

2. Consume anti-inflammatory herbs and nutrients such as tart cherry juice, ginger, vitamin C, and turmeric. Try drinking 8 ounces of tart cherry juice before you exercise. You can dilute it with water if it is too tart. In addition, you can add anti-inflammatory herbs like ginger powder and turmeric to your favorite fish and chicken dishes.

3. Stay away from alcoholic beverages before you exercise. They can dehydrate you and lead to cramps and soreness.

4. Add one teaspoon of baking soda (sodium bicarbonate not baking powder) to 8 ounces of water. Drink this mixture on an empty stomach at least one hour prior to exercise. Sports scientists learned several years ago that baking soda taken before athletic performances not only increased performance but reduced soreness and cramping afterwards. That’s because baking soda reduces lactic acid build-up in our muscles.
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