Diets in Review - Find the Right Diet for You

hyperthyroidism



Check in With Your Thyroid for National Thyroid Month

February is not just all about Valentine’s Day, chocolates and hearts. It’s also focuses on awareness of a butterfly-shaped hormone gland known as the thyroid. The thyroid has the difficult task of controlling your metabolism, growth, development, and body temperature. The thyroid gland is located on the throat and wraps around the windpipe. The presence of too much or too little thyroid hormone is determined by a blood test. So how will you know if you have an over or underactive thyroid and why would it happen?

There are many ways thyroid function to be affected, including the body attacking itself or cancers. Graves disease is an autoimmune disease that causes an increase in thyroid hormone. Overactive thyroid causes symptoms like more frequent bowel movements, feeling anxious, increased body temperature and sweating, loss of hair, increased heartbeat, and weight loss even with having increased appetite. It can also affect the menstrual cycle by causing lighter, shorter periods. It also possible to develop a goiter which is an enlarged thyroid gland. This condition is usually treated with medication to block the stimulation of the thyroid, removal of the thyroid, or radioactive iodine to help shutdown overactive thyroid cells. Many of these procedures end up causing patients to have an underactive thyroid that has to be treated with medication.


Read Full Post >



Yoga Poses for Thyroid Health

The thyroid gland is located in the front of the neck and is responsible for producing hormones that affect metabolism, energy levels, body temperature and temperament. When the thyroid gland is out of balance either by producing too much thyroid hormone (hyperthyroidism) or too little (hypothyroidism), we can gain or lose excessive weight, feel abnormally hot or cold, or act unusually listless or agitated for no other apparent reasons.

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, thyroid disease has several causes, including, but not limited to, Hashimoto’s disease (an auto-immune disorder), inflammation of the thyroid gland, a defect present at birth, radiation treatment, partial or complete removal of the thyroid gland and the effects of taking certain medications.

Maintaining a healthy thyroid gland is important for overall health and wellness. Of course, while it is crucial to see your doctor if you suspect thyroid trouble, there are a few preventative measures you can do to take care.


Read Full Post >