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high intensity exercise



3-Move HIIT Workout for Fast Full-body Toning

By Cindy Whitmarsh, a certified personal trainer, nutritionist and fitness correspondent for Good Morning San Diego. 

The popularity of High Intensity Interval Training (“HIIT”) has surged, and if you haven’t tried it yet now is the time.  I just released three new DVDs based on HITT, which I call my  Ultra Focused Interval Training (UFIT) program.

What exactly is HIIT? It’s a workout that is meant to push speed, endurance, and strength to the next level. You perform activities at a VERY high intensity for short bursts, or intervals, and you complete multiple sets of these intervals with minimal rest between them. This drives your heart rate up, forcing your body to adapt and accommodate.

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Just what do I mean by “adapt”? With HIIT, you’ll burn calories in the moment but you will also increase your excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (“EPOC”) which basically means that you’ll continue to burn more calories even long after your workout is over. This can will lead to significant changes in muscle tone and strength, along with a reduction in body fat.


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Swahili Military Endurance Workout Tabura Gains Popularity

Tabura, translated in Swahili, is a type of training used to improve military endurance and strength in Africa. Recently CRUNCH fitness has turned this military exercise into a workout regime combining kickboxing, West African dance moves and, in an odd twist, live music.

As with many high intensity workouts, Tabura, is sure to burn a ton of calories. We recommend to stretch and stay hydrated during and after any intense fitness program.

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Visceral Fat: Why It’s Different and How to Get Rid of it

By James O’Brien

The human body has two kinds abdominal fat: subcutaneous and visceral. Subcutaneous fat is the stuff that you can pinch and move with your hands; visceral is the kind that can make the belly bulge, but feel hard to the touch (the notorious beer gut). Even if you don’t sport a beer belly, you might still have visceral fat that could be giving you health problems.

While being overweight is not an ideal state of health in general, it’s the visceral fat in particular that nutritionists and health experts cited at ScienceBlog.com connect most commonly with diabetes, glucose-related problems, hypertension, and heart disease.

Problem is, visceral fat doesn’t always stick out. Doctors have discovered thin-looking patients whose abdominal organs are packed with visceral fat. These people face the same kind of health risk as their more obviously beer-bellied counterparts.


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