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gut bacteria



Dr. Oz Suggests Korean Pine Nuts May be Dependable for Hunger Suppression

Announced recently on Dr. Oz, pine nuts are showing a possible weight loss effect due to their main ingredient, pinolenic acid, wjocj helps suppress the appetite and eliminate cravings. While research has shown that a large amount of this acid is found in the pine nuts which helps people feel more full for a longer period of time, it’s still not something that should be applied broadly to pine nut species, as Dr. Oz is doing.

When experiencing hunger suppression, body weight can consequently be reduced by keeping people from overeating the daily recommended dose of calories. Studies show that the pinolenic acid found specifically in Korean pine nuts acts on two gut hormones that work to satisfy hunger. One hormone’s job is to slow the gastric process that is emptying and the other is in charge of absorption of food in the gut. Research participants who were given pine nut oil showed a rise in these hormones and proclaimed to be fuller.

The Dr. Oz crew received this information from iTrustNews.com, where many of the benefits of pine nuts and their weight loss effects are discussed. They say consumption of these nuts can be in several different forms, including raw, powdered and liquid, and people can still get the beneficial pinolenic essential acid ingredient by eating any of those.
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Why Fermented Foods and Gut Bacteria Matter to Our Health

By Dana Shultz and Mary Hartley, RD

Belly up. It’s time for a discussion on two important health topics that just so happen to be incredibly unsexy: Gut bacteria and fermented foods. Yep, here we go.

These two terms often conjure up images of grotesque stomachs and intestines and the most detestable foods you can imagine. But if you can get past the questionable terminology, fermented foods and healthy gut bacteria are extremely important to our health.

According to a recent article from NPR, a new study has found that diet can promote beneficial bacteria in the stomachs of older people, and as a result, promote healthy aging.

Scientists looked at the diets of 178 elderly people, some of whom lived on their own and the rest lived in assisted living centers or nursing homes.

Researchers found that those living on their own had more varied gut bacteria and scored better on tests measuring frailty and cognitive function because they had more diverse diets rich in fiber, fruits, vegetables grains and poultry. Conversely, those living in assisted living centers subsisted on more of a  “mashed potato and porridge” style diet that offered less variety and nutritional value.
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