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Food Packaging Shrinks While Prices Stay the Same

If you have been to the supermarket lately, you might have noticed that the prices of your favorite groceries have increased a little bit. The price of almost everything from fresh veggies to bread to milk is increasing. Hershey has even recently announced that they will be increasing the prices of all of their goods by 10 percent.

By increasing their prices, some companies worry that these straightforward price hikes will result in consumers buying less of each product or choosing cheaper alternatives, such as store-brand cereal instead of General Mills. The answer to this dilemma for the food companies? Decrease the amount of food in the packages but keep the prices the same- and, sadly for consumers, the food companies have no obligation to the consumers to tell them about this reduction.

So how much of a reduction are we talking about? The largest reduction from our list will go to Reese’s peanut butter cups, who will reduce their chocolate-peanut-butter goodness by 37 percent, or 0.1 ounces. Chicken of the Sea Tuna will be reduced by 1 ounce, or 17 percent of its total weight. Heinz Ketchup will also take four ounces of their standard bottles, reducing the bottles by 11 percent. However, it’s not only food products; non-food products are also taking a hit. Bounty paper towels will be reduced by 10 sheets, or 7.2 percent. Toilet paper and moist towelettes are also likely to be reduced in the near future, if not already.


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General Mills to Reduce Sugar in Breakfast Cereals

A lot of food companies have been working toward improving the nutritional profiles of their products. The latest player, General Mills Inc, is lowering the amount of sugar in its breakfast cereals for children to no more than 10 grams per serving from 11 grams a year ago.

This is a move closer to its goal of reducing to single-digit level the number of grams of sugar per serving in all of its cereals advertised to children under 12.

One of the reasons the company has targeted breakfast cereals made for kids is the growing problem of obesity; more children are developing adult health problems such as diabetes and high cholesterol.

General Mills, which also sells Progresso soup and Yoplait yogurt, said it must reduce sugar in tiny, incremental steps, lest consumers notice the difference and stop buying.


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