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How to Cook with Arugula

Arugula is most commonly known as a salad green. But had you ever cooked with it? If not then get ready, because digging into this nutrient-rich green and showing you all the versatile ways it can be used so it can become a healthy staple in your kitchen in no time.

What is it? When I think arugula, I think leafy green with a peppery taste. And that’s true. But more accurately, it’s a cruciferous veggie that’s been dubbed a superior salad green. Arugula is in the same family as broccoli, brussels sprouts and kale. And compared to iceberg lettuce, arugula – also known as rocket or rucola -  has 70% more calcium, 50% more magnesium, 60% more beta-carotene, and 60% more Vitamin A. Now that’s one seriously nutrient-packed green.

Health benefits: Arugula is an excellent source of folate, a B Vitamin that supports the health of red blood cells and helps with energy production. A 2-cup serving contains plenty of Vitamin K and Vitamin A, and is a plant-based source of iron, making it an incredibly healthy nutrient option for vegans.
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How to Cook with Jicama

Ever felt afraid of cooking with unfamiliar ingredients, like jicama? Well fear not because we’re digging into the health benefits of this versatile food, and showing you several cooking techniques and recipes so it can become a healthy staple in your kitchen in no time.

What is it? 

Jicama (pronounced HEE-KA-MUH) is a round, bumpy root vegetable that’s actually in the legume family. It can be recognized by its brown, paper-like skin and white starchy flesh. It’s similar in texture to an apple or celery and takes on the flavor of the dishes it’s added to incredibly well, much like water chestnuts in Asian food. Jicama is also commonly referred to as a yam bean or Mexican turnip or potato.

Health Benefits:

Jicama has fewer carbohydrates than a potato, making it a great option for those watching their weight. And it’s also high in fiber, vitamin C, potassium, and contains a lot of water to help you stay hydrated.
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How to Cook with Quinoa

Ever felt afraid of cooking with unfamiliar ingredients, like quinoa? Well fear no more because we’re diving into the health and nutrition benefits of this versatile grain, and showing you several cooking techniques and recipes so it can become a healthy staple in your kitchen in no time.

What is Quinoa?

Quinoa is a small, whole grain substitute that’s completely gluten-free. It takes on a rice-like texture when cooked and comes in a variety of colors – including red, gray, green and white – depending on where it’s grown. It’s been speculated that quinoa has been around for nearly 5,000 years and was first cultivated in the Andes throughout Peru, Bolivia and Chile. And although it’s commonly thought of as a grain, the individual beads are actually the plant’s tiny seeds.

Health Benefits:

Quinoa is extremely healthy. It’s low in sodium and high in calcium, and a high-quality protein containing all nine essential amino acids. It’s also rich in phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, iron, copper, manganese and zinc. And it’s widely praised as a great option for those trying to consume less meat without missing out on protein.

Nutritional Statistics:

One cup of cooked quinoa contains roughly 220 calories, 3.5 grams of fat, 39 grams of carbohydrates, 3.5 grams of fiber, and 8 grams of protein.
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The State of Food and Obesity in the U.S.

Obesity rates and other related statistics are rolled out every year, sometimes even more frequently, with each seeming worse than the last. The U.S. is on a fast train that’s heading towards a brick wall, unless something can be done to put on the brakes, and better yet, put it in reverse!

The overriding question that has to be on everyone’s mind is how did we get here and why does it seem we are helpless when it comes to making better food and lifestyle choices?

There is no doubt that a major component to our growing obesity problem is that we are less active than ever before. We live in a technology-based world where more and more of us sit in front of computers and televisions (remember when you didn’t have 300 channels and the entire world’s information at your fingertips?). Even careers in manual labor fields that provide some form of physical exercise have become more automated.
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Food Impacts Judges’ Decision Making

Ever had an important decision to make and been told to “sleep on it”? I bet you’ve never been told to “eat on it”, but after reading about this new research, you just might consider it.

The graph below illustrates the likelihood of a favorable decision from a judge based on when he or she takes a break to eat. At the start of each session, Israeli prisoners were likely to be granted parole 65% of the time, but that certainly was not true right before the judge decided to take a break.


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