Diets in Review - Find the Right Diet for You

Emily Fonnesbeck



New Added Sugar Recommendations are Finally Created

By Emily Fonnesbeck RD, CD, nutritionist for the Biggest Loser Resort.

The American Heart Association has released new recommendations for added sugar consumption. This is actually the first time a recommendation has been given, and just in time. Sugar intake in this country is at an all time high and the over consumption is being linked with increased risk for obesity, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia (high cholesterol, high triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol and/or high LDL cholesterol).

This is interesting since in the past, fat has been the macronutrient that has been villainized. But looking at the data over the past few decades, intakes of protein and fat have either stayed the same or gone down. So all these extra calories are coming from carbohydrates; not whole grains unfortunately, but refined sugary foods.

The average American consumes about 300-350 extra calories per day in added sugars. This is equivalent to 79 grams or 22 tsp of sugar (1 tsp is equivalent to 4 grams of sugar). The new recommendations are 100 calories, 24 grams or 6 tsp for women and 150 calories, 36 grams or 9 tsp for men. To give you some perspective, one 12-oz can of soda has 33 grams of sugar.


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Grilling Can Save Your Diet at Summer BBQs

By Emily Fonnesbeck RD, CD, nutritionist for the Biggest Loser Resort.

As the weather warms up, you may find yourself attending many outdoor barbecues. The good news is grilling is a great way to prepare foods. It requires no water and has a short cooking time, two variables that can lead to nutrient loss. Water leaches vitamins from food and longer cooking times can destroy nutrients. The bad news is that grilled foods are often served with heavier dishes.

Here are some tips on how to lighten up your summer barbecues.


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Healthy Lunch Meat Brands for a Better Sandwich

By Emily Fonnesbeck RD, CD, nutritionist for the Biggest Loser Resort.

Generally speaking, I don’t really like lunch meat. Most are high in sodium, contain fillers and byproducts, and are processed with nitrates and nitrites. But I realize they are convenient so if you are willing to spend a little more money, you can control the quality of the product.

Specific brands I recommend are Boar’s Head, Applegate Farms, Nature’s Promise and Wellshire Farms. These will be 100% meat without the fillers and may have low sodium varieties, which I would recommend if you can find them. They are most likely be found at the deli counter rather than prepackaged on the shelf. Choose turkey, chicken, lean ham or even lean roast beef over pastrami, liverwurst, pepperoni, salami or bologna.
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Eat Food, Not Stuff Simple Rules of Clean Eating

Emily Fonnesbeck is the Registered Dietitian for the Biggest Loser Resort.

You have probably heard the term “clean eating” a lot lately. It is definitely a new buzz word, or term, that is getting a lot of attention. The actual definition is unclear, and up to interpretation. My definition of clean eating would be – “Eating Real
Food.”

In my lectures, I stress the importance of eating “food” rather than “stuff”. When people watch their calorie intake, often they only monitor the quantity of the calories taking no thought for the quality of the calories. This may lead to using artificial no-calorie sweeteners, fat-free salad dressings, or having a Snickers bar for lunch. With clean eating, or focusing on real foods, you would instead use less of an unprocessed sugar, a high quality vinaigrette, and eat a well balanced lunch of
veggies, whole grains and lean proteins.
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6 New Pumpkin Recipes for Fall

Emily Fonnesbeck is the Registered Dietitian for the Biggest Loser Resort.

I love pureed pumpkin. It is such a tasty way to sneak in a vegetable and it just screams fall. It is loaded with vitamin A, fiber, magnesium, potassium, zinc, iron, and antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin, which contribute to health of the eyes. At just 40 calories for 1/2 cup, pumpkin is a very nutrient dense food. Here are a few ways I like to use it:

Pumpkin Yogurt: Mix plain non-fat Greek yogurt with pumpkin (I usually do equal amounts or slightly more yogurt) and season with vanilla and cinnamon. This can be used as a dip or as a base for breakfast with the addition of fruit, oats, cereal, and/or flaxseed.

Smoothies: Add a spoonful (or more if you’re daring!) to your regular smoothies. I recommend pumpkin, almond milk, banana, milled flax seed, cinnamon, vanilla and a scoop of almond butter. Blend together and enjoy a nice refreshing drink!
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