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diet myths



Why is Everyone So Terrified to Eat Bananas? A Dietitian Peels Back the Truth

banana
by Amy Margulies, lead registered dietitian for Retrofit

You’ve probably heard people talking, or read articles online, about why eating bananas is bad for you nutritionally and can impede weight loss. While some people insist that bananas are just fine, others are convinced this is a fruit you should stay away from if you’re trying to lose weight – and many do, just in case the rumors are true. But what’s the real deal with bananas? It’s time to peel open this myth.

What the critics are saying

The controversy started with Dr. Susanna Holt, an Australian researcher who developed the Satiety Index, a way to evaluate how full different foods make you feel. “We found that bananas are much less satisfying than oranges or apples,” Holt stated at the conclusion of the satiety study.

Bananas are generally higher in calories from carbs than most fruits. So for those who are counting calories, this may seem like a poor choice for a snack. People have also observed that bananas cause a “binding” effect, or put more simply, they cause constipation. That’s something you don’t want when you look to the scale for signs of progress.
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5 Biggest Diet Myths Debunked on Dr. Oz

Check out Dr. Oz’s November 7 episode to find out the five biggest diet myths people believe today. The stage becomes a scientific laboratory as Dr. Oz dons safety goggles and joins his friend Science Bob to discover what’s true and what’s not in the world of dieting. 

Questions such as “does water shrink your waistline?,” “does aging make you gain weight?,” and “should you wait until you’re hungry to eat?” are debunked as myths as Dr. Oz gives audiences the real truth behind these misconceptions. He shares the shocking myths that your own doctor believes and that he was also told in medical school that simply are not true.
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Water is Good For You, but it Won’t Flush Away Fat

If you mention weight loss it seems a million “tips” or “pieces of advice” come flying out of the woodwork. There’s many of them out there like, “Don’t eat after such and such time,” “Stop eating bread and carbs,” or “Eat eight tiny meals a day.” Most of this can be overturned and found to be another empty promise of how to lose weight. One myth that seems to be pushed is about how water has the power to flush out fat from the body. Sadly, it seems this may be just another myth.

The myth is often stated that, “drinking eight glasses of water a day flushes out fat.” Truth is, that’s simply not true.

“…There’s no magic about drinking water,” says Sue Gebo, RD, MPH, an assistant professor at the University of Connecticut School of Medicine.

Gebo explains that water cannot flush away fat, that is just a hopeful myth. While water can not perform this trick, a Virginia Tech University study explains how this myth may have started.

The study found that people who drank 16 ounces of water prior to eating a meal actually consumed 75 to 95 fewer calories than the control group. Both groups in the study were on prescribed low-calorie diets and on average the water drinkers lost more weight, 4.5 pounds more than the non-water drinkers.
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Why Eating on a Schedule Can Keep You Slim

If you’re a foodie like me, then you try to experience as many delicious foods as possible throughout the day without gaining weight. This can prove to be a difficult task, but one of the keys I’ve found to be most effective is eating on a regular schedule. Turns out, this now has some scientific backing thanks to a new study validating the health benefits of scheduled eating.

In an effort to confirm whether or not weight gain may be caused in part by eating on an odd schedule, scientists conducted a study involving the eating patterns of mice. They fed two groups of mice a high-fat diet, but allowed one group to eat whenever they wanted. And not-so surprisingly, this group gained weight.

For the second group of mice, scientists restricted their allotted meal times to an eight-hour window. As a result, these mice did not gain weight even though they consumed the same amount of calories or more than the mice with an un-restricted eating schedule.

Over the course of the 18-week study, the mice that were time-restricted experienced fewer negative effects on their high-fat diet, and even saw an increase in metabolism when compared to the un-restricted mice. The restricted group also reportedly gained 28 percent less weight and suffered less liver damage.
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Is Moderation in Diet a Myth?

By Abra Pappa for NutritiousAmerica.com

The end goal, for me, with all of my clients is to reach a point where living is flexible, fun and free of denial and discipline. To discover an eating dogma that is ideal for the individual. An eating plan that supports every cell in the body and contributes to a feeling of abundance and vibrance. Which, for me, should also include eating a burger or a slice of pizza from time to time. Question is, is it really possible to moderate these indulgent meals? Or is indulgence a slippery slope?

There are as many dietary theories as there are people in the world. If you don’t subscribe wholly and completely to one specific (and seemingly strict) dogma (i.e. vegan, raw, paleo) yet you live a supportive healthy life filled with glorious whole foods, would you say you practice moderation?

Are there actually people that successfully practice moderation? Or is it truly necessary to adhere to a strict eating plan in order to transform your life with food and reach your health goals?

Here are my top 3 tips to make moderation possible and bust the myth that it is not!
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