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We’re Not Making Grades, and Our Kids are Paying for It

A report card was just released on physical activity for kids in the United States. Sadly, if the U.S. were a student, it would definitely be going to summer school.

active kids

The first-ever United States Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth was devised as a way to evaluate the levels of physical and sedentary activity in American kids. Those who created the card hope it can be used to demonstrate how important physical activity is, and why people need to do what they can to make sure kids get more of it.


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New Mobile App Feedie Invites you to ‘Share Food. Literally’

Let’s face it, we all love taking pictures of our food and sharing them on social media. Whether it’s because the food was pretty, cheap or simply delicious, it’s likely that at least one of your meals has made its way to your social media pages. What if sharing a picture of your meal could turn into actually sharing a meal with someone in need? That’s the question the founders of Feedie asked themselves.

Feedie from Feedie on Vimeo.

Feedie is a new mobile app launched by the same people who created the Lunchbox Fund, an organization started in 2004 to help bring meals to hungry children in South Africa. Topaz Page Green, Co-Founder of the Lunchbox Fund, is from South Africa though she’s been living in New York for the last 12 years. She said that the organization was started in response to the 65 percent of children living below the poverty line in South Africa. “Nelson Mandela started a food program for children in schools,” Green said. “It reached around eight million children.” She added that while that program was a benefit, it left some kids out, something she couldn’t bear.


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FDA Denies Ban of BPA in Food Packaging

The Food and Drug Admisnistraion is denying The Natural Resources Defense Council’s (NRDC) request to ban BPA from the United States.

The Food and Drug Administration’s assessment is that the scientific evidence currently suggests that the very low levels of human exposure to BPA through the diet are not unsafe.

With the support of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and the National Toxicology Program (NTP), scientists at FDA’s National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR) have been studying BPA. The NCTR researchers have been conducting in-depth studies of BPA since September 2008 to see if there are potential toxic effects of BPA on fetuses, infants and children.

According to a statement released from the FDA, the findings showed the level of BPA from food that could be passed from pregnant mothers to the fetus is so low that it was immeasurable. Researchers fed pregnant rodents 100 to 1,000 times more BPA than people are exposed to through food, and could not detect the active form of BPA in the fetus eight hours after the mother’s exposure. The study also showed BPA exposure to infants were lower than previously believed. In fact, 84 to 92 percent lower than previously estimated.
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