Diets in Review - Find the Right Diet for You

cheese



The Scientific Quest for a “Healthy” Cheese Leaves us Flavorless

By Abra Pappa for Nutritious America

In a world of endless food “science” it isn’t terribly surprising that even the mighty cheese is subject to investigation, processing, and testing in an attempt to create a cheese-like-food-product that scientists will deem “healthier” by reducing sodium and fat. In this never ending quest to make all food “diet worthy” and eternal dieters “happy” there is no food spared from their turn in the science wheel. Yet, each time we’ve attempted to replace a natural, whole food with a processed version of the food the results of “health” have not exactly worked out.

Case in point: changing butter to margarine. The partially hydrogenated fats that were originally thought to be much healthier then butter’s saturated fat have since proved to be the exact opposite. Why would a “new” cheese be any better?

The average American consumes nearly 30 pounds of cheese per year; that is an awful lot of fat and salt. But, cheese is so much more than a block of fat and salt, it has a story, a life, a history.

If you have ever spent time with a cheese expert or any amount of time in a real cheese haven like Murray’s cheese shop in New York City, you may have been graced with some of the history and story behind cheese. Stories of generations of sheep farmers in France creating glorious cheese from humble resources, or small American artisinal cheese makers who, with a much shorter history of cheese making, are taking this culinary world by storm. Cheese has been consumed as a traditional food in many cultures for literally thousands and thousands of years, and yet it is just in the last 50+ years that we are seeing the steep decline in the health of people. It makes us ask, is cheese really to blame?
Read Full Post >



How to Cook with Goat Cheese

By now you’ve likely seen goat cheese on salads in fancy restaurants and in the dairy aisle at your local grocery store. But have you ever seen it in ice cream, pizza or on a tart? Perhaps you have, but these were little food discoveries that I was thrilled to stumble upon as I love the tangy flavor and creamy texture of this little-known cheese.

Health benefits: The health benefits of goat cheese are plenty, the first and most obvious being its calcium content. Health experts suspect that our body uses calcium to burn off fat after meals. And it’s well known that calcium helps maintain the strength and density of our bones. Calcium can play a role in various body functions such as muscle contraction and blood pressure regulation, and it’s even been linked to potentially preventing migraines.

Goat cheese is also high in phosphorus, vitamin B2, potassium and vitamin A. And according to Bellchevre, it contains 27 percent more of the antioxidant selenium than cow’s milk!

In addition, goat cheese is considered the ‘skinnier’ cheese as it’s much lower in fat and calories than other cheeses, such as brie and cheddar.
Read Full Post >



Billboards Blame Obesity on Cheese. Do Your Thighs Agree?

If you love cheese, you’re not alone, and you may not want to read this.

The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) believes cheese to be the guilty culprit of our nation’s obesity problem. They believe it so much that they have recently began a billboard campaign in Albany, New York. Large billboards display dimply thighs or flabby guts and read, “Your Thighs on Cheese,” or “Your Abs on Cheese.”

Are they right? Is the ooey gooey goodness of cheese really the enemy?

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s estimates, Americans have tripled the amount of cheese they eat each year since 1970. Today, the average American eats 31 pounds of per year. Let’s be real, that’s a lot of cheese!

Neal Barnard is part of the PCRM and clearly stated how he feels about our cheese consumption, especially our children’s cheese consumption. “Cheese and other dairy products are the leading source of saturated fat that our kids are swallowing. And I think most Americans are totally oblivious to it.”
Read Full Post >



Celebrate National Panini Month with Five Healthy Sandwich Tips

August is National Panini Month and with temperatures too hot for the oven in most parts of the country, there is no better time to whip up a healthy version of your favorite pressed sandwich.

Though there are a number of ways to make a healthy panini, Chef Tiffany Collins offers some tips about how to take ordinary ingredients, combine them in inventive ways and easily grill them on a panini press for a delicious, crunchy sandwich that won’t derail your diet.

Pick whole-grain breads to make your panini healthy and satisfying. When you’re choosing bread for your sandwich, opt for bread that is rich in fiber. Some wheat breads are not actually made with whole grains, so read labels carefully before you purchase. If the first words on the ingredient list are not “whole grain” or “whole wheat,” it is not really a whole grain.


Read Full Post >



How To Make a Healthy Grilled Cheese Sandwich

April is Grilled Cheese Month!

The grilled cheese is one of the best sandwiches out there, and, let’s face it, one of the least healthy choices around. Soaked in butter and fried, often made with full fat cheeses and white bread, it can be a heart attack waiting to happen, full of fat and high in both calories and refined carbohydrates. How can you make a grilled cheese sandwich part of your healthy lifestyle?


Read Full Post >