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cauliflower



Get it While it’s Hot: Cauliflower is THE Vegetable of 2014

A delicious new trend has been popping up everywhere lately, and I am all for it: Cauliflower is having a moment, sprouting up in all sorts of recipes and proving that it is one of the most versatile vegetables out there. (It’s a side! It’s a main dish! It’s probably even a dessert somewhere!)

cauliflower

Have you noticed this trend? We’ve been spotting cauliflower recipes all over the web and cauliflower dishes on restaurant menus, sort of like Brussels sprouts circa 2007.

So what are the best things to do with this hearty veggie, which is low in fat, but high in fiber, water, and vitamin C? I’m so glad you asked! With no further ado, the best cauliflower recipes to try out ASAP:

Mock Potato Salad
Like the mashed potato idea you may have heard of but with a summery twist! This recipe for “mock potato salad” is brilliant. There are no potatoes in this salad, but cauliflower instead. Everything else you will recognize from your favorite potato salad recipes: eggs, mayonnaise, celery, mustard, dill. Warm weather friendly!

Cauliflower Tater Tots
There is not a potato in sight in this phenomenally addictive recipe. Only (spoiler alert!) cauliflower! Served as a side dish or even the main course, the recipe calls for not much more than cauliflower, coconut oil, and seasoning. Yum.
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The Secret Health Benefit of Cruciferous Veggies

cruciferous

By Team Best Life

All vegetables are good for you, but certain groups may pack a greater nutritional punch than others. Take cruciferous vegetables, the family that includes broccoli, cauliflower, bok choy and more. They’re loaded with antioxidant vitamins and phytochemicals, which offer protection against a number of illnesses, including heart disease, cancer, and Alzheimer’s, according to research.

Now, experts say they may have figured out why these veggies are so beneficial: They seem to reduce inflammation, which plays a role in many of these diseases. In the study, people who ate the most cruciferous veggies had the lowest levels of three different inflammatory compounds—as much as 25 percent less—in their blood compared to those who ate the least cruciferous veggies.
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How to Cook with Cauliflower

Is it just me or was cauliflower the one vegetable I wouldn’t touch as a child? Well, to be fair, I wouldn’t go near creamed corn either; the two repelled me faster than the phrase, “Here are your weekly chores.” But, just as I’ve matured over the years, so has my palette, and cauliflower has grown to become one of my favorite vegetables to prepare and eat. Plus, it’s healthy!

Health benefits: If you can get past the white color and interesting texture of cauliflower, you’ll begin to reap its benefits, which are plenty. For starters, cauliflower is excellent for healthy digestion which is common among cruciferous vegetables because of their high fiber and water content.

Cauliflower is also a great source of omega-3 fatty acids and Vitamin K, both of which can help prevent inflammation. It’s also high in folate and several b vitamins, including riboflavin, niacin and thiamin. And last but not least, cauliflower contains one of the highest amounts of glucosinolates, second only to broccoli, which can promote detoxification in the body and even help prevent certain types of cancers.
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Healthy Recipe: Italian Turkey Burgers with Cauliflower and Carrot Salad

Guess what? Burgers don’t need to be bad for you. They also don’t need to be served alongside a heaping pile of French fries. With this healthy turkey burger recipe, you get nearly 3 tablespoons of heart-healthy monounsaturated olive oil paired with veggies and lean protein.

Italian Turkey Burgers with Cauliflower and Carrot Salad
Serves 4

Burgers

  • 1 lb 99% lean ground turkey breast
  • 1/2 sm onion, finely chopped
  • 2 Tbsp unsalted tomato paste
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1/2 tsp dried oregano
  • 1/2 tsp dried basil
  • 2 tsp olive oil
  • 4 slices provolone (1/2 oz each)
  • 4 whole wheat hamburger buns
  • 6 tsp no-salt-added ketchup
  • 4 leaves romaine


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Dr. Oz’s Ultimate Antioxidant Checklist

Tune in this Wednesday, December 1 to the Dr. Oz Show to learn about the foods you need to be eating to prevent disease and enhance your longevity.

Dr. Oz’s ultimate antioxidant checklist makes healthy living and eating easy and simple for you. This list narrows down the top fruits, vegetables and supplements you need to incorporate into your diet to feel great and look younger.
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