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caffeine



Monster Energy Linked to Five Deaths, Including a Teenage Girl

Energy drinks are taking a hit this week. Specifically, Monster Energy. The highly caffeinated drink has been cited in five deaths and other dangerous health incidents, which have lead the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to investigate.

CBS News reported this morning that many claims of adverse reactions to Monster Energy drinks have been reported. The drink is a 24-ounce carbonated beverage with 240 milligrams of caffeine. For perspective, that amount is seven times that found in a regular 12 ounce soda.

The most recent startling news about the drink involves the death of a 14-year-old girl. The teen reportedly drank two 24-ounce Monsters in a 24-hour period and later died. Her autopsy determined she died of cardiac arrhythmia due to caffeine toxicity. CBS reports that the child’s parents were never properly warned by Monster about its possible risks.
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Pre-Workout Supplements Boost Energy and Focus

It’s Friday at 4:30 p.m. and the clock couldn’t be moving any slower. It’s been a long week and you’re more than ready for the weekend to begin.

The only problem (besides the last 30 minutes feeling like an eternity) is you haven’t gotten your workout in for the day. You’re thinking to yourself, “I’m not in the mood to workout”, and it’s the last thing on your mind with the exciting weekend you have planned. In order to avoid skipping the gym, put a few of these motivational ideas of use.

Take a pre-workout supplement
A lot of avid gym-goers that are faithful to their workout routine take a pre-workout supplement before every workout. Pre-workout supplements enhance your workout with ingredients such as caffeine and creatine, which give you a boost of energy and help you maintain more mental focus.
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Energy Drinks Under Investigation by New York State Attorney General: Is it Worth the Fight?

By Rachel Berman, RD Director of Nutrition at CalorieCount.com

Just as the new school year is getting underway and students everywhere are looking for a pick-me-up to stay focused in class, the NY State Attorney General announced his investigation of energy drinks and the safety of their caffeine levels. You might remember a couple of years ago when the USDA forced removal of products from the marketplace, such as Four Loko, which added caffeine to alcohol. They deemed it unsafe since caffeine masks the depressant qualities of alcohol and people who mix the two are more likely to binge drink, according to studies.

However, it seems like there’s a new product appearing every week touting its ability to keep you awake and energized. Energy drinks are a billion-dollar industry, the fastest growing segment of the beverage market, and they generally contain caffeine, other plant based supplements, simple sugars and additives to achieve their goal. According to the CDC, about one-third of teenage Americans consume energy drinks. But the problem is that the drinks are considered dietary supplements and therefore aren’t tightly regulated by the FDA like other foods and beverages. So can energy drinks be bad for your health?

Cap the caffeine

The caffeine content listed on energy drinks doesn’t usually exceed the recommended 400 mg per day for adult. However, if you’re downing more than one or mixing with coffee, soda, and other caffeinated beverages, you might be getting more than you need. The FDA recognizes caffeine as a drug and regulates the amount found in carbonated soft drinks, but not in energy drinks. Too much caffeine can cause increased heart beat, interrupted sleep, irritability, and nervousness. In addition, some studies have found that high caffeine content in energy drinks results in irregular heart beat and increased blood pressure.
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New Study Shows Breastfeeding Mothers Can Consume Caffeine

My friend and I were carpooling to work this morning and we somehow got on the topic of motherhood. Neither of us are mothers yet, but hope to be in the future. And I jokingly wished for the day that we could ‘just stay at home and breastfeed all day.’

But then, I recalled some breastfeeding horror stories I’d heard and quickly retracted my wish. Besides it being difficult and tiring, I heard you can’t have wine. And more importantly, you can’t have coffee. This last one really rocks my boat as I am a coffee fiend.

However, I found it equally ironic and relieving to come across a new study today that revealed mothers of newborn babies can drink caffeine without having it interfere with the sleep of their babies. Could it be true? Because if that’s the case, bring on motherhood. Maybe.

As reported in an article by NPR, the study was conducted in Brazil in 2004 and followed the sleep patterns of 885 infants, all of whom but one had mothers who drank caffeine. Most of the women drank a moderate amount of caffeine – either in coffee of tea form – both during and after pregnancy. And 20% consumed more than 300 mg a day. And for reference sake, a Starbucks grande contains about 300 mg of caffeine.
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FDA to Investigate AeroShot Caffeine Product

aeroshot caffine inhalerThe FDA plans to investigate the safety of AeroShot, a lipstick-shaped dispenser that delivers a does of caffeine without the liquid. Users inhale a vapor of caffeine and B vitamins, which are then swallowed. The caffeine-filled inhaler is sold online, and at some stores around New York and Boston.

New York Senator Charles Schumer encouraged the FDA to look into the product, and wrote a letter to the agency expressing his concerns back in December. He argues that there may be legitimate uses for the AeroShot, like “the business man staying up late who doesn’t want to drink that cup of coffee, that’s OK.” However, he’s worried about potential abuse of the product, such as people who might use it to be able to drink more alcohol.

AeroShot creator David Edwards is confident that the product is safe and says that it was thoroughly tested. Furthermore, there are many liquid energy shots on the market that with much higher levels of caffeine. The AeroShot contains about 100 milligrams of caffeine total, roughly the amount found in one cup of coffee. Two hundred to 300 milligrams of caffeine is considered a safe and moderate dose per day for adults.


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